GOP Senator Says Donald Trump Should ‘Tweet A Little Bit Less’ After Controversial Whistleblower Retweet

Sen. John Kennedy also said he wishes to know the true identity of the anonymous whistleblower so that the person can be called to testify as a fact witness.

President Donald Trump introduces U.S. Sen. John Kennedy during a rally at CenturyLink Center.
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Sen. John Kennedy also said he wishes to know the true identity of the anonymous whistleblower so that the person can be called to testify as a fact witness.

President Donald Trump sparked massive backlash last week after retweeting an article that named the alleged whistleblower that sparked the impeachment inquiry. At least one of his Republican allies in the Senate believes he should take a step back from Twitter for a while as a result.

According to The Washington Examiner, Sen. John Kennedy on Sunday told the host of CNN’s State of the Union, Jake Tapper, that he’s previously suggested to those in-the-know at the White House that he thinks Trump should essentially show a little restraint when it comes to using Twitter.

“With respect to what the president tweeted, well, I have enough trouble paddling my own canoe. But I do agree with Mrs. Trump that — and I’ve suggested before to the White House that if the president would tweet a little bit less, it wouldn’t cause brain damage,” Kennedy said, before adding that he doesn’t expect the president to heed his advice.

The controversy erupted on Thursday after Trump hit the retweet button on a post that shared a direct link to a story from The Washington Examiner which included a name of who they believe the alleged whistleblower could be. It has never been confirmed that the person they named is the whistleblower, though the person’s name has been widely reported by right-leaning online news outlets.

Kennedy, a strong ally to the president since the beginning of the impeachment inquiry, told Tapper that he wants to know the true identity of the whistleblower and acknowledged that it hasn’t been confirmed that Eric Ciaramella fits the bill. However, Kennedy also said that whomever the person is, that they should be called to testify.

Sen. John Kennedy speaks to reporters after attending the Republican weekly policy luncheon.
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“I don’t know who the whistleblower is. Number two, I think we ought to follow the law. Number three, there have been some allegations in the press about the identity of the whistleblower,” Kennedy said.

“If those statements are true, one of the thoughts I had was that, well, the whistleblower could easily be called by the defense. Not as the whistleblower, but as a fact witness.”

As previously reported by The Inquisitr, Trump has been advised by some of his closest advisers, including his daughter, Ivanka Trump, and White House lawyer Pat Cipollone, to refrain from publicly announcing the person’s identity. Of course, that advice was largely ignored when the president retweeted the article on Thursday.

The person who was named as the alleged whistleblower reportedly experiences waves of threats, presumably spiking when the president or other high-profile outlets or people drop the person’s name. As a result, that person also has received armed security protection and continues to work for the Central Intelligence Agency.