Donald Trump And Stormy Daniels Arrest: Cop Who Busted Daniels Is Trump Fan, Posted Trump Memes, Avenatti Says

According to social media posts, an account reportedly linked to a Columbus, Ohio, undercover police officer has posted numerous memes supporting Donald Trump.

Donald Trump, stormy Daniels, 2016 presidential election, Columbus Ohio, Twitter
Mario Tama/Getty Images/MediaPunch / AP Images

According to social media posts, an account reportedly linked to a Columbus, Ohio, undercover police officer has posted numerous memes supporting Donald Trump.

When adult film star Stormy Daniels was arrested on Wednesday, as Inquisitr reported, her lawyer Michael Avenatti claimed that the arrest was “politically motivated” and a “setup.” Daniels has filed two widely-publicized lawsuits against Donald Trump since March of this year. Now Avenatti says he has evidence that one of the undercover officers who busted the 39-year-old Daniels at the Sirens strip club was a supporter of Trump, based on social media posts uncovered by online sleuths.

Daniels was arrested on charges that she allegedly violated a state law that bars nude or partially nude performers from touching anyone who is not a family member while inside an adult entertainment establishment. But on Thursday, police in Columbus, Ohio, issued a statement claiming that the arrest of Daniels, whose legal name in Stephanie Clifford, came as part of an ongoing investigation into “human trafficking,” CNBC reported.

The three misdemeanor charges against Daniels were dropped on Thursday, but Avenatti said that he would pursue legal action if he found evidence that officers were motivated by the fact that Daniels has filed lawsuits against Trump

“We demand a full and OPEN investigation into the conduct of the officers, including an examination of their social media accounts (some of which were mysteriously taken down earlier today),” Avenatti said Thursday on his Twitter feed. “Certain of these accounts appear to have been very pro-Trump. In the event it is discovered that my client was targeted and arrested because of our opposition to Mr. Trump, the resulting lawsuit and action will be swift and devastating. That is not a threat. It is a promise.”

Donald Trump, stormy Daniels, 2016 presidential election, Columbus Ohio, Twitter
Stormy Daniels in a mug shot from her arrest in Franklin County, Ohio, late in Wednesday night. Franklin County Sheriff's Office / AP Images

Avenatti told CNBC that he had “serious doubts about the truthfulness” of the police claim that Daniels’ arrest stemmed from a “human trafficking” investigation. And then, later on Thursday, he posted a message to his Twitter feed saying that with the help of Twitter users, he had found several posts from an account believed to belong to Detective Steve Rosser, the Columbus police officer who, according to Avenatti, “was at the center of the arrest of my client.”

The lawyer noted that he had not confirmed that the account, credited to “Stevo Shaboykins,” belonged to Rosser.

The memes included a “Cops for Trump/Pence” logo and other images and text supporting Trump. Avenatti’s Twitter message including the memes can be seen on this page, below. But another Twitter user pointed out, in a reply to Avenatti, that a Twitter feed that also may belong to Rosser contained pro-Trump posts.

The Twitter account “follows” only nine other accounts — three of them belonging to prominent Trump supporters — Fox News hosts Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson, as well as former Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke.

Three of the other accounts followed by the @SSaboykins Twitter account belong to women who are performers in the adult video industry. At least two of the women, Lucy Tyler and Ava Kelly, appeared in the 2015 film Hot Girls Wanted, a documentary critical of the pornography industry.

A statement on Thursday by Columbus Police Chief Kim Jacobs called the arrest of Daniels “a mistake,” as the Inquisitr reported.

Avenatti has also accused the police officers who busted Daniels of “entrapment,” according to NBC News, saying that it was the officers, not Daniels, who initiated the physical contact. According to the Columbus Dispatch, Rosser was involved in a 2015 case when a judge said that he had entrapped employees in a local bar into serving alcohol to underage customers.