‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Rumor: Why Luke Used The Blue Lightsaber Instead of The Green One

It might be one of the smallest moments in the movie but it is also the most impactful.

Luke Skywalker in 'Star Wars: Episode 8 - The Last Jedi'
Disney and Lucasfilm

It might be one of the smallest moments in the movie but it is also the most impactful.

Star Wars: Episode 8 – The Last Jedi continues to be picked apart by fans as they prepare for the two-year wait for the third and final film in the sequel trilogy.

One of the mysteries that some are still seeking answers to is why Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) Force projected the blue lightsaber in his attempt to help Leia (Carrie Fisher) and the Resistance in the final act of the film instead of the green-bladed one.

According to the popular and ever-ardent Star Wars watcher and YouTuber Star Wars Explained, the Jedi master chose that specific version for a very important reason.

The Star Wars analyst explains how Force wielders tend to use gestures at times when using the Force. For Luke, he does not feel the need to do so when he is lifting rocks, but he has to reach his arm out when he lifts his X-wing in Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back because in his mind, this is harder than the former and he feels that the gesture will help in building the Force connection.

Star Wars Explained believes the same idea applies to Force projection. He says that Luke used what he deems his best representation of himself to project himself as a convincing hero onto Crait.

This is the final image that everyone else will ever see and remember him by—the one that will be the subject of stories and word of mouth—so that when the legend of Luke Skywalker is told from world to world, it will ignite newfound hope that will be the foundation of a bigger and stronger Resistance in Star Wars: Episode 9.

In Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Luke expressed frustration about being regarded a legend in the galaxy, but he soon embraced that as he made his final bid to save his friends and what’s left of the Resistance.

His plan proved successful as the next generation, embodied by the kids in the final scene of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, are already telling and retelling his heroics and are even inspired by it, as evidenced by the Force-sensitive kid from Canto Bight whose eyes were full of determination and hope as he watched the Millennium Falcon disappear into space.

What Luke did in one of the most emotional moments of Star Wars: The Last Jedi also ultimately set the path of the new generation of heroes in the galaxy far, far away that will allow for a better understanding of the Force.

This is why he did not choose the green lightsaber, Star Wars Explained speculates. In becoming the legend the Resistance and the oppressed needed, the green lightsaber felt out of place in the heroic image Luke is going for in his final Star Wars: The Last Jedi scene. It is a reminder of his failure and lowest point as a mentor.

It is the very weapon he almost used in his most shameful moment—the few seconds of instinct where he tried to kill his nephew Ben Solo (Adam Driver) after learning of the darkness inside of him.

In turn, his Force projection in Star Wars: The Last Jedi served as the portrait of his redemption—he becomes what the galaxy needed him to be after being gone for so long and ultimately developed into the epitome of what it truly means to be a Jedi.

At the same time, Luke also chose the version of himself that looked a lot like the one that Ben Solo last saw to rile him up enough to buy Leia and the others time to get to safety.

Since the new supreme leader’s emotions can get the best of him at times, as seen in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, he failed to notice all the hints that point to the deception, allowing Luke to successfully trick him.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi is still in theaters. Its second week suffered the biggest drop in the history of any movie in the Star Wars franchise at this point in the screening. But on its third week, the Rian Johnson film bounced back, and according to Forbes, only saw a 23 percent drop, which is smaller compared to Star Wars The Force Awakens‘ second week that saw a 30 percent dip.