Drone Hunting Season? Colorado Judge Says ‘Let’s Vote!’

drone hunting season colorado vote

Drone hunting season may be opening in Colorado this Spring. A judge has given the town of Deer Trail the all clear to take a vote on whether or not they can allow their citizens to hunt drones flying in their airspace.

Recent NSA spying reports have made people from all around the country concerned about the government’s involvement in everything from online gaming to Amazon’s proposed drone delivery system. The people of Deer Trail, Colorado are taking it to the next level. They want the right to make drone hunting season a reality.

Phil Steel originally authored the ordinance to legalize drone hunting earlier this year. His first attempts were shot down, but the town did not give up. As the ordinance made it’s way through the courts, it eventually landed in the hands of a district judge. The original petition only needed 19 signatures. Deer Trail has a small population of 500 and only 370 are able to vote.

The town is divided on the drown hunting ordinance. Town clerk Kim Oldfield, who has been accused of pushing the petition through, says, “I feel pretty dang good about the judge’s decision. I feel like I’ve been vindicated and now the people will be able to hold the vote.”

Steel voiced his approval of the judge’s decision. “At one point, I was deeply concerned that Deer Trail was not able to handle the concept of Democracy,” he said. “This is an opportunity for the people to take to the polls and defend what’s their’s.”

Not everyone is excited about the prospects of drone hunting in Deer Trail. It is expected that at least 40 of the 370 voters will be opposed to the ordinance. But Deer Trail mayor Frank Fields is hoping that the ordinance may open the town to tourism. In his logic, who wouldn’t want to shoot down flying drones?

The vote will be held on April 1, 2014 and is sure to attract media attention. In case you want to begin making vacation plans now for Deer Trail, Colorado, the cost of a drone hunting license would be $25 per year and every drone would have a $100 bounty. But don’t bring your junk machine parts. You have to provide proof of “identifiable parts of an unmanned aerial vehicle whose markings and configuration are consistent with those used on any similar craft known to be owned or operated by the United States federal government.”

Would you get a license for drone hunting season?