RompHim - Rompers for men

Bro-Rompers Are Now A Thing Because It’s 2017 And Nothing Makes Sense Anymore

There once was a time when rompers were lumped into the same category as overalls, jumpsuits, and one-piece bathing suits. But now that it’s 2017, the unfashionable stigma associated with all things one-piece have apparently vanished, for bros and non-bros alike.

Thanks to ACED Design, men are now allowed in the one-piece circle.

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you “RompHim,” the male romper.

Heading into #coachellaweekend2 with our freshest new styles. Great for #pooltime, #festivalseason and everything in between.

A post shared by Original RompHim (@originalromphim) on

ACED Design’s Kickstarter page claims that RompHim “may just be the start of a fashion revolution.”

According to ACED Design, men’s fashion is “either too corporate, too fratty, too ‘runway,’ or too basic.”

“We were sitting around drinking beers one evening and got to talking about the men’s clothing options out there,” the business student founders wrote on the Kickstarter page. “Everything was either too corporate… too fratty… too ‘runway’… or too basic… Why wasn’t there anything out there that allowed guys to be more stylish and fun without also sacrificing comfort, fit and versatility?”

With just one month left to go on its Kickstarter, ACED Design has raised more than $85,000 from 800 backers as of Tuesday evening, completely knocking their original $10,000 goal out of the park.

Backer Levels

ACED Design started its campaign with eight backer levels – “Be a RompHero,” a basic pledge for $5; “Team RompHim,” which includes a special iron-on patch and laptop sticker for $25; “Early Adopter Special,” a limited pledge that includes an early product arrival of an Original RompHim for $90; “Kickstarter Special,” which includes an Original RompHim for $95; “Original 2-Pack,” which as the name suggests, comes with two of ACED Design’s original RompHim styles for $175; “4th of July Edition,” a limited time pledge that includes a “one-of-a-kind, red, white, and blue edition for $190; “Original 3-Pack,” which includes three Original RompHim styles for $255, and “Join the ACED team!” a pledge that promises the donor an entire day in the Chicago factory where the ACED team will “take you behind the scenes and help you design and create your own custom RompHim” for $1,250.

RompHim - a new trend in men's fashion
Screenshot from ACED Design Kickstarter page.

The Design

RompHim rompers come fully equipped with deep front shirt pockets, adjustable waist tabs, a zippered back pocket, and, of course, a zipper fly.

According to the fundraiser page, RompHim will be available in Red Chambray, Blue Chambray, and Splatter Print Cotton in addition to other color options.

RompHim - the newest trend in men's fashion
[Image by ACED Design Kickstarter page]

And, as an added bonus, ACED Design has laid out a special sizing chart for romper virgins.

“We realize that wearing a romper will be a new experience for many of our customers – so we think this calls for a new approach to sizing,” the site reads. “Instead of giving only garment measurements, we have created recommended ranges based on your height, chest size, and the waist size of your favorite pair of pants.”

The Concept

The concept of a male romper isn’t exactly groundbreaking. In 2012, male rompers (Mompers, Manpers) showed up on the runway at Madrid Fashion Week before quickly vanishing from the fashion world completely.

Then, a brand by the name of Davidelfin decided it was time to unleash the male romper and a few high rollers in the industry couldn’t agree more while others weren’t as enthused.

“Rompers are a new way of producing fashion for men,” Decio Vitali, a fashion editor at Italy’s Collezioni told The Daily Beast.

In 1991, Michael Kors experimented with the idea of male onesies – a shirt attached to underwear – for his very first menswear collection, but soon realized the discomfort of his design.

“I had never worn one of these bodysuits or thought about how, when a man sends his dress shirts to the dry cleaner, he would send his underwear attached,” Kors wrote in Newsweek.

“I had never thought about the discomfort of the snaps, the oddity of getting undressed in front of anyone, or going to the bathroom.”

Thankfully, the modern bro-style romper has a built-in zipper.

[Feature Image by ACED Design courtesy of www.aceddesign.com]

Comments