Why Is Climate Change A Political Debate? [Opinion]

Once, when experts presented facts, they were accepted. But now, climate change is a political issue instead of a matter of hard science.

Polar bear in green, rocky landscape with no ice
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Once, when experts presented facts, they were accepted. But now, climate change is a political issue instead of a matter of hard science.

The First World Climate Conference was help in 1979. At that time, it was determined that “carbon dioxide plays a fundamental role in determining the temperature of the earth’s atmosphere, and it appears plausible that an increased amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can contribute to a gradual warming,” according to the official declaration, PBS reports.

Today, there is what is called a scientific consensus on climate change, and NASA is among the expert organizations that agree global warming is a solid fact. More than 18 scientific associations agree that the evidence of climate change is indisputable.

Scientific academies, U.S. government agencies, and intergovernmental groups agree on a widespread level that global warming is a fact, proven time and again by a preponderance of data.

So why do climate change deniers exist? The simple answer to that question is ExxonMobil.

ANDREWS, TX - JANUARY 20: An oil pumpjack works at dawn in the Permian Basin oil field on January 20, 2016 in the oil town of Andrews, Texas. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
  Spencer Platt / Getty Images

The U.N. formed the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 1988 to assess the impacts of climate change and come up with a global plan for the world to follow. This led to the Kyoto Protocol in 1997, which called for 37 industrialized nations to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

And in 1998, ExxonMobil decided to do something about it. A reduction in greenhouse gas emissions equals a reduction in profits for the oil and gas companies. Exxon began to fund groups to show that the science provided by the IPCC was, in fact, wrong. Among these groups was the Global Climate Science Team, tasked with creating a national plan to challenge the science of climate change.

In 2001, the U.S. withdrew from the Kyoto Protocol under President George W. Bush. In 2011, a Republican-led Congress eliminated the Committee on Global Warming.

And in 2018, the IPCC created another report that’s more dire than any of the warnings of the past. The panel of scientists says that Earth has about 12 years to make extremely drastic changes, or the effects of climate change will be irreversible. This will put the human race on a collision course toward massive famine and huge worldwide changes, as reported by Inquisitr.

Yet, there are still politicians and pundits who say that climate change simply isn’t real.

Oil is big business. It’s also a very dirty business that increases CO2 emissions. But it is a business that is well-known for funding political campaigns, usually for the Republican party. This is the party that leads the charge on climate change denial.

All the incorrect science, twisted data, and double-talk has muddied the issue of climate change for 20 years now, but accepted, agreed-upon science tell us this: we are destroying the world and ourselves. If we don’t stop, mankind may not survive as a species and Earth may not survive as a planet.

Can you put a price on 7 billion lives?

ExxonMobil made a $19.7 billion profit in 2017, and reported an $8.4 billion profit in the fourth quarter of the year alone. Investopedia calls Exxon a “massive and reliable money machine.”

So maybe you can put a price on how much the human race is worth.