Brett Kavanaugh’s Confirmation Vote Must Stop In Light Of Julie Swetnick’s Shocking Allegations [Opinion]

Why isn't the Senate Judiciary Committee making one of Kavanaugh's best friends -- and his alleged partner in crime -- Mark Judge, testify?

Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation vote must stop.
Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Why isn't the Senate Judiciary Committee making one of Kavanaugh's best friends -- and his alleged partner in crime -- Mark Judge, testify?

Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote must stop in light of Julie Swetnick’s shocking allegations, as put forth by Politico.

Swetnick, a Washington D.C. resident who has received multiple U.S. government clearances for working at the Treasury Department, U.S. Mint, IRS, State Department, and Justice Department, is the third woman to accuse Trump’s Supreme Court pick Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault.

In statements made under penalty of perjury, Swetnick alleged that Kavanaugh and his friend Mark Judge were complicit along with “numerous” other boys of “gang raping” multiple girls while in high school. She claims to have been a victim once, herself, while having witnessed Kavanaugh’s and Judge’s efforts “to spike the drinks of girls at house parties I attended with grain alcohol and/or drugs so as to cause girls to lose inhibitions and their ability to say “no,” according to CNBC.

Swetnick says that some of these girls were targeted because they were “especially vulnerable because she was alone at the party or shy.” She also says that Kavanaugh indulged in “abusive and physically aggressive behavior toward girls” while in high school.

She is the third woman to have accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault. Christine Blasey Ford and Deborah Ramirez are already set to testify before Congress on Thursday ahead of his confirmation vote. Ford has also accused Kavanaugh of assaulting her while drunk in high school in the presence of one of his best friends, Mark Judge, and Judge’s presence is something that Swetnick’s account appears to corroborate. Ramirez has accused Kavanaugh of assaulting her at a house party during their freshman year in Yale, and she also paints a similar picture of Kavanaugh’s drunken behavior toward women as claimed by Swetnick and Ford.

In addition, Kavanaugh’s claims of being a virgin while denying the first two allegations on Fox News seemed to invite even the scorn of his own wife, according to the Inquisitr. His yearbook, which has been analyzed extensively by The New York Times, paints a very picture of different Kavanaugh while in high school. If anything, it shows “horrible, hurtful” Kavanaugh boasting of sexual conquests of girls studying in nearby schools while at the same time celebrating his devout affliction to drinking in his school years.

All of these claims — while unproven — are serious allegations against the character of a man who is about to become a judge in the highest court of law in the land. The appointment of Kavanaugh for a period of three decades of more — barring some accident or ill-health — is arguably an even more important decision than choosing the president of the country. After all, the president can do little if the congress is not with him, or if the Supreme Court is not amenable to his executive orders.

It is the decisions taken by supreme courts and congresses of countries which make democracies what they are — rather than the whims of a single man. That is why all mature democracies have proper checks and balances in place.

In this context, it is the Senate Judiciary Committee. Before it goes ahead with confirming the next Supreme Court Justice for life, the American people must make sure that the man is thoroughly vetted. There can be no rush, no matter how much the Republicans — and President Donald Trump — might want Kavanaugh to be appointed. The delay is inconsequential when compared to the stakes.

All three women are willing to testify, and they must be heard. Mark Judge should be made to speak in front of the American people. The FBI must get involved.

Kavanaugh needs to prove his worth or be removed from consideration.