It’s A Shame ‘Christopher Robin’ Was Overlooked [Opinion]

Have audiences let Winnie The Pooh go?

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Have audiences let Winnie The Pooh go?

In a time where everyone is so busy they can’t take the time to enjoy themselves, Disney’s Christopher Robin had a message more people should be heeding.

According to Box Office Mojo the movie has barely scraped $62 million worldwide; meanwhile movies like Avengers: Infinity War are raking in billions across the world, with plenty more movies set for release.

Christopher Robin tells the story of an adult Christopher Robin — the boy most loved by Winnie The Pooh — going off to boarding school, dealing with the death of his father, then going off to war, and finally resigning to a busy life of working himself to the bone. As Robin abandons a fun weekend with his wife and daughter in lieu of working all weekend, again, his buddy Winnie The Pooh shows up to remind him that his life is happening in real-time. It’s not some theoretical event just on the horizon.

Winnie The Pooh isn’t bothered by numbers or sales figures or anything of the sort. Instead, he wants a red balloon, a smackeral of “hunny,” and to name everything he sees for no reason other than the fun of it. As the movie goes on, an initially annoyed Christopher Robin rediscovers his childhood wonder and learns how to enjoy himself again.

We also get a ton of great one-liners from Eeyore.

In a moment where Christopher Robin declares he’s going to “get to the bottom” of a mysterious sound, Eeyore responds, “I’m already at the bottom.” The grim nature of Eeyore simply never gets old and never stops being relatable.

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It’s a tad bit ironic that the movie didn’t do particularly well at the box office, considering people were busy seeing Mission: Impossible – Fallout for the second weekend in a row. Movie audiences don’t really have time to stop and smell the roses with Winnie The Pooh anymore. They need pulse-pounding action, super heroes with six packs, or horrors that leave them traumatized.

Christopher Robin offers little in the way of excitement or controversy. It offers nothing in the way of political commentary. It’s a break from everything and a return to our childhood. A moment to say “remember when we weren’t all losing our minds? Remember when things seemed nice?”

And it so appears the response from audiences was a resounding “No, we do not remember. And if we do remember, we’d rather not.”

If you missed this movie, maybe take an afternoon and catch a matinee before it leaves theaters. It’s a love letter to a simpler time and to a simpler you.

But only if you can find the time.