As ‘Rugrats’ Gets ’90s Nostalgia Treatment, These Classic Nickelodeon Programs Still Need A Reboot [Opinion]

Can Clarissa explain why these five programs aren't back yet?

At the kids choice awards
Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Can Clarissa explain why these five programs aren't back yet?

Hulu announced the return of Animaniacs recently, and people are squealing in excitement, cites Variety. With ’90s top-notch cartoons such as Rugrats, Rocko’s Modern Life, The Magic School Bus, and Animaniacs all getting revivals, fans of various kid channels such as Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon are left crossing their fingers for more favorites to get a reboot announcement. Adult ’90s kids often remark on the need for modern children to experience cartoons and other programming that are as quirky, educational, and downright addictive as the timeless childhood hits they grew up with. The ’90s were especially packed with grade-A programming that still remain a strong source of nostalgia for many, growing to be loved by younger generation children who are exposed to the shows.

So strong is the desire to see old cartoons make a comeback, that Nickelodeon, Hulu, and Netflix, in particular, are in agreement with the slew of begging fans who want to see certain shows back on the air. Nickelodeon network previously re-aired some of the older ’90s cartoon reruns, finally released Hey Arnold: The Jungle Movie after more than a decade of grown ’90s generation fans waiting, are officially bringing back Rugrats — as reported here at the Inquisitr and are officially planning a reboot for Clarissa Explains It All, says Hollywood Reporter. Here are the top five Nickelodeon cartoons and programs that need to be brought back.

1. AAAHH!!! Real Monsters

Placing this at No. 1 comes in part because of a lesser known fact about AAAHH!!! Real Monsters. The success of Rugrats is why Real Monsters came into existence. Graphic designer Arlene Klasky and animator Gábor Csupó, married in 1979 and they were the powerhouse couple behind the original yellow design of, wait for it, none other than The Simpsons, including the idea for Marge’s beautiful blue hair stalk. Alas, after only three years, Klasky, Csupo, and that show ended the business association. Fortunately, before that happened, the couple and Paul Germain created Rugrats; the cartoon ended up being the No. 1 kid’s television show, according to Bloomberg. Because of this, Nick asked Klasky and Csupo to come up with another smash hit. Drawing inspiration from their own children, along came AAAHH!!! Real Monsters, reports Mental Floss.

The show originally aired only a few days before Halloween in 1994, with the final episode showing on December 6, 1997. Krumm, Oblina, and Ickis charmed practically every kid in the 1990s as these strangely adorable monster children struggled through life while attending class in their secret underground school with The Gromble, learning how to scare humans properly. This cartoon had just the right amount of creepy, spook-show entertainment for the kiddos.

Since this show was originally created due to the success of Rugrats, which is making a grand come-back, fans can only cross their fingers that AAAHH!!! Real Monsters will yet again roll out.

Get ready for The Adventures of… Super Monster and Belch Boy! #AaahhRealMonsters

A post shared by Aaahh!!! Real Monsters (@officialaaahhrealmonsters) on

2. Are You Afraid of the Dark?

This fantastic landmark in children’s television ranks in at No. 2 because, technically, Nickelodeon has already given Are You Afraid of the Dark? a revival. In 2017, Are You Afraid of the Dark?: A Tribute, directed by Directed by Nathaniel Ingram and Zac Lockard, brought to life a new campfire story, “The Tale of the Ghostly Guest,” cited Bloody Disgusting. Not even two years later, it is expected that yet another Are You Afraid of the Dark feature film adaptation of the show will be released by Paramount in 2019. That was also explained in further detail by Bloody Disgusting in a more recent release just this past April. With all the buzz around Are You Afraid of the Dark?, there should be absolutely no reason a new television series can’t be done.

Fans adored this show, which first came to Nickelodeon on Halloween 1990 and lasted through June 2011. A spooky anthology series where young members of a fictional secret group known as the Midnight Society, taking turns telling scary stories to one another around a campfire in the woods, is sure to once again be a huge hit among modern children and teens if only given the chance.

Submitted for the approval of the Midnight Society, is the suggestion to please come back on television with new episodes.

3. Legends of the Hidden Temple

Not a cartoon, but a widely popular action-adventure game show for youth, Legends of the Hidden Temple comes in at No. 3 since it’s similar in concept to the already returning Double Dare. E News reported on the summer reboot of Double Dare in April, announcing that the new host would be Jason Harris. Classic game shows are typically a hit. With reports surging such as the one from NPR spot-lighting the lack of fitness in today’s generations, bringing back more physical, adventure-related inspirations such as Legends of the Hidden Temple could potentially be part of at least one game-changingg effort.

From 1993 to 1995, six new teams competed on each episode for some sort of prize. The premise was to go through Olmec’s hidden temple in retrieval for a special, historical artifact inside. Whether your favorite team was the Blue Barracudas, Red Jaguars, Green Monkeys, Orange Iguanas, Purple Parrots, or the Silver Snakes, kids watching were always excited to see contestants perform physical stunts and answer tough trivia questions based on history, geography, and mythology.

Not bringing this show back for today’s kids would be a disservice, as Legends would not only inspire teens and kids to become more active, it was always extremely educational.

4. KaBlam!

Coming in at No. 4 due to entire biased reasons is one of the most quirky, cartoon packed, and fun shows. KaBlam! lasted from 1996 to 2000. Take a moment to watch the original theme song and opening credits. The credits alone speak to why this amazing show needs to come back.

This show had four seasons that charmed many ’90s kids into binge watching segments of random and recurring cartoons hosted by animated hosts, June and Henry. Robert Mittenthal was the mastermind creator of this series that definitely belongs back on television. KaBlam! was super innovative, giving viewers a collection of shows and short films in various animation styles. It was created for SNICK and became rated TV-Y in 1997. A nicktooon that was a critical and commercial success, even going on to earn a heavy cult following, KaBlam! could easily gain an even larger fan base by incorporating new segments mixed with the old.

5. Stick Stickly

Okay, technically Stick Stickly is a character and not a television show, which is the only reason he isn’t coming in at No. 1. He does, however, stand a chance of being the most realistically easy integration, especially considering that Stick Stickly has consistently been a reoccurring host for various Nickelodeon programming. This friendly Popsicle stick with googly eyes, jelly bean nose, and tiny mouth hosted Nick in the Afternoon during the summers from 1995 to 1998. Kids adored Stick Stickly so much, that even years after he was kicked off the air, the wooden host would be seen in various Nick promos for the TeenNick programming block The 90s Are All That. In September 2011, Stickly came back again, hosting every Friday for a new version of “U-Pick,” only to be placed on hiatus in March 2012. Yet again, Stickly came back in 2013 to host a 1990s game show week, then returned on a regular basis in June 2015 for more “U-Pick.” This mascot made yet another return in 2016.

Face it, Nickelodeon, everyone loves Stick Stickly. Bring the mascot on full-time again, “U-Dip” and all. Certainly bring back his once upon a time half-hour series, Oh Brother. Let Stick travel to New York City with his twin, Woodknot again.