Three Democrats Who Would Defeat Trump In 2020 [Opinion]

Trump appears comfortable right now, but in 2020 he might begin singing a different tune.

Three democrats that could beat Trump in 2020
Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

Trump appears comfortable right now, but in 2020 he might begin singing a different tune.

Although Trump likes to tout a landslide presidential victory in 2016, the truth is, he barely eked out a win.

Objectively losing the popular vote seems unimportant to Trump, but the truth of the matter is, with a slightly more competitive opponent, Trump would most likely have experienced a landslide loss.

Approximately 3 million more Americans voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016 than voted for Donald Trump in the general election. Trump’s good fortune came in the form of voting weight. Regardless, the name of the game wasn’t popular vote, but the electoral college. But with a less divisive Democratic ticket, states like Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and even Florida would have likely gone blue.

Michigan went to Trump by less than 1 percent, while Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Florida went red by less than 1.5 percent. While Trump seems comfortable with declaring a decisive, unwavering victory, the truth is, his chances of winning in 2020 are slim if a Democratic candidate as resonant as Bernie Sanders takes on the current presidential administration. Here’s a look at three likely candidates who would lead the left to victory in 2020.

3. Bernie Sanders

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 11: Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks at a rally with MoveOn members and allies gather with leading senators to demand that the Senate vote to reject Mike Pompeos nomination for Secretary of State at US Capitol on April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for MoveOn.org) Tasks Katopodis / Getty Images

It’s been stated by many outlets that Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont hasn’t ruled out the possibility of running in 2020. While he lost in the primaries to Hillary Clinton in 2020, let us not forget that Clinton lost in the primaries to Obama in 2008. She still won the Democratic nomination in 2016. One primary loss hardly equates to another. Moreover, Sanders was viewed more favorably by many polls in the 2016 general election against Donald Trump. For that matter, some Sanders voters switched their support to Trump after bitter feelings about Hillary Clinton’s win. Sanders would not only take Democrat votes, he’d also take some from Trump.

2. Joe Biden

NEW YORK, NY – APRIL 18: Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speaks onstage at the Biden Courage Awards Presented by It’s On Us at the Russian Tea Room on April 18, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for It’s On Us) Theo Wargo / Getty Images

Sanders and Biden both tick the “too old” boxes by conventional wisdom, but Trump himself has taken conventional wisdom out of the equation, having been elected at the age of 70. If re-elected, Trump would be 74 at the time of inauguration for a second term. Biden would only be four years older at 78. Aside from that, Barack Obama supporters would come out in droves for Biden. Furthermore, Biden seems to like sparring with Trump on verbal level. It would be a match fitting 2020 indeed.

1. Kamala Harris

LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 30: Senator Kamala Harris attends ‘Families Belong Together – Freedom for Immigrants March Los Angeles’ at Los Angeles City Hall on June 30, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for Families Belong Together LA) Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

The Washington Post recently reported that Kamala Harris would not rule out a possible 2020 bid. While Kamala Harris was relatively unknown on the national political landscape as early as a few years ago, today polls suggest she’d beat Trump, according to SF Gate, suggesting the California Senator is a rising star.

Younger and perhaps with her finger planted more firmly on the pulse, Kamala Harris also agrees with Senator Bernie Sanders on a number of issues, having co-sponsored his Medicare For All bill in 2017.