Roy Moore Supporters Attack Muslims, Gays, Horny Teenage Girls [Opinion]

Brynn AndersonAP Images

Rick Wiles is one of those people who believe that Roy Moore is the savior who is going to ride his white horse up the Capitol steps and save this country from suffering the same fate as Sodom and Gomorrah.

On his national radio program TruNews, Wiles has detailed some of the menaces Moore will have to face if Alabama voters elect him to the U.S. Senate Tuesday.

Wiles warns his listeners of the dangers of Islam.

“Islam must be eliminated from the face of the earth,” he says, according to Right Wing Watch. “It must be stomped out like cockroaches. It is a religion from hell.”

Even worse, Wiles confides that if angels were walking this earth, gay men would rape them, again according to Right Wing Watch.

Wiles, who also serves as minister of Flowing Stream in Vero Beach, Florida, has been sounding the warning for years on everything from Y2K to his nemesis, Barack Hussein Obama, a name he always pronounces with an emphasis on the Hussein.

Wiles is one of 15 ministers who showed their support for Roy Moore with their pocketbook between September 6 and November 22, according to his most recent campaign finance report filed November 27 with the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

The ministers, in addition to Florida, come from Texas, New Mexico, Ohio, California, Illinois, South Carolina, and a couple of them even hail from Alabama, according to the FEC documents.

Stan K. Cooke, pastor of the Kimberly Church of God, Kimberly, Alabama, stood on courthouse steps recently during a press conference covered recently by the Birmingham News to refute charges made by women who claim that Moore dated them or sexually assaulted them when they were teenagers and Moore was already in his 30s and working in the district attorney’s office.

“Allegations are words; they aren’t facts,” Cooke said.

He was particularly worked up about Beverly Nelson’s accusations, which included a signed yearbook, which has come into dispute, but he also addressed allegations that Moore had been banned from the Gadsden Mall for stalking teenagers, saying it was all politics.

“Some people are seeking vengeance for past events that they have concocted, said or dreamed up.”

The other Alabama minister on Moore’s contribution list, Mike Allison, pastor of the Madison Baptist Church for the past two decades recently offered his evaluation of Moore during a CNN interview.

“I know the man. I know he’s a good man, a godly man. He’s a man who stands for right.”

As for the accusations against Moore, Allison says, “If he says he didn’t do it, I believe him.”

Moore blamed “the liberal media,” who else, for its effort “to malign the good name of Judge Moore.”

Wiles is not the only national name to put some money into the Moore campaign.

Rusty Thomas is the minister in charge of Operation Save America, formerly known as Operation Rescue, the nation’s foremost anti-abortion activist organization.

Thomas, in a YouTube video posted by Right Wing Watch, says the attacks on Moore are “demonic. We are dealing with lies, we are dealing with fraud, we are dealing with accusations against the brethren.”

Thomas sounded the battle cry.

“Christians, this is not the time to protect your political hides.”

Moore’s contributors also included Franklin Raddish, pastor of the Capitol Hill Independent Baptist Ministry in Greenville, South Carolina, who claims the attacks are not just on Roy Moore but are all part of a “war on men.”

Raddish explained his theory in a Birmingham News article

“More women are sexual predators than men. Women are chasing young boys up and down the road, but we don’t hear about that because it’s not PC.”

That must be what is wrong with the media. Instead of focusing on young girls chasing boys, the media keeps writing about men in their 30s trolling underage girls and if Raddish is right, those 14-year-old girls may have been chasing Moore.

Of the ministers, only Wiles contributed a large amount to the Moore campaign, giving $2,700.

The others, who don’t have national radio shows promoting conspiracy theories, gave in amounts ranging from $50 to $400, with a couple of them sending a few dollars every week.

Featured image credit: Brynn AndersonAP Images

Some of the pastors have worked alongside Moore in his battles against gay marriage and to keep a monument of the Ten Commandments at the Alabama Supreme Court Building.

It seems likely that all of them believe they are sending a shining hero to battle the evils that confront the United States and according to Wiles, have it well on its way to destruction.

If the election turns out the way they want Tuesday and Roy Moore punches his ticket to the U.S. Senate, then perhaps they will no longer have to live in fear of gays, Muslims, presidents with the middle name Hussein, and horny teenage girls who set their sights on a heroic middle-aged man.