‘Blade Runner 2049’ With Ryan Gosling Presents A Horrifically Plausible Dark Future [Opinion]

Blade Runner 2049 is a worthy and faithful sequel to the original 1982 cult classic. Ryan Gosling portrays “K,” the updated version of Harrison Ford’s Rick Deckard. The greatest difference is the audience, 35 years later. Living in 2017 makes Blade Runner 2049 absolutely terrifying.

In 1982, Blade Runner was a fantasy film with its own dark, sensuous, dystopian world. Blade Runner was vastly different from the reality of the 1980s. In 2017, thousands of post-apocalyptic and dystopian films later, Blade Runner 2049 seems an all too feasible outcome of the current society.

Blade Runner 2049, with Ryan Gosling, comes at a time when there is a significant conversation about artificial intelligence. Also, 2017 is a time when an astounding percentage of people expect the future to be dark, dystopian, and even post-apocalyptic.

Ryan Gosling portrays “K,” who is even colder than Harrison Ford’s Rick Deckard. While Harrison Ford’s Blade Runner character was hardened, Ryan Gosling’s “K” goes further. Ryan Gosling’s “K” distances himself in a way that reflects the cold environment, as explained beautifully in Katie Walsh’s review on Madison.

“His nonchalance reflects the emotionally remote environment, the uneasy, distrustful daily existence in this dystopian, isolated future.”

Ryan Gosling’s portrayal of “K” speaks volumes about desensitization, as well as the stoicism, that’s frequently mentioned in connection with Gosling’s character. At times it seems “K” is losing his humanity.

While Ryan Gosling’s “K” has grown cold, his world, the world that caused his disconnect, is only slightly more advanced than the current reality. Blade Runner 2049 is “all too plausible,” says the Madison review.

“The drone warfare, dumpster bandits, child labor, and sex robots are all simply extensions of things that already exist.”

Ryan Gosling’s “K” is living in a world not too different from reality, and that’s the terrifying part of Blade Runner 2049. While there are not many sex robots yet, robotics is a real and growing field as is artificial intelligence. Sexual exploitation is so rampant in society already that no one would doubt the potential market.

Emphasising Blade Runner 2049’s chilling resemblance to life in 2017, the movie features powerful visuals, evoking strong emotional cues in the audience. The cinematography and design are amazing.

Sylvia Hoeks, Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling. and Ana de Armas stars of Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049’s cast, including Ryan Gosling, Sylvia Hoeks, Dave Bautista, and many others, faithfully portrays life in the dehumanizing dystopia similar to the original Blade Runner even more powerfully than the first film, as noted in Madison.

“The style is rich, the themes are complex, but the story is a simple, classically cinematic tale. A man is faced with an existential quandary through which he reckons with his own soul and identity in the face of incredible dehumanization.”

Harrison Ford is back for Blade Runner 2049 as well. Ford’s Rick Deckard meets his predecessor “K,” portrayed by Ryan Gosling. The meeting of Harrison’s Deckard and Ryan’s “K” gives the film greater continuity with the original, which was a genius casting move.

Blade Runner 2049 is amazingly successful in captivating the audience, and in reproducing the original Blade Runner world in a way that perhaps surpasses the original, according to The Globe And Mail.

“Villeneuve has successfully enlarged the Blade Runner canvas, creating a film that goes new places and asks more questions as it wonders what marvels and horrors humanity and technology might have in store for each other.”

Harrison Ford and Ryan Gosling star in Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049 has been well received by critics, according to Rotten Tomatoes, scoring 89 percent fresh. Not surprisingly, 82 percent of the audience “liked it.”

Blade Runner 2049’s dystopian world is both a natural progression of the original film and a natural progression of society. Ryan Gosling’s “K” could be the natural progression of humanity.

Blade Runner 2049 with Ryan Gosling is a significant film, just as the original was. Sadly, it’s all too realistic in light of recent developments in technology and society.


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Blade Runner 2049, with Ryan Gosling, is scary because it seems a far more likely future than Blade Runner did in 1982.

[Featured Image by Faiz Zaki/Shutterstock]