Birth Control Pill Effective A Month After Sex Faces Political Problems

A new birth control pill that works up to a month after sex could be headed to markets. But why isn’t it out yet? It’s not the science holding the pill back — it’s political controversy, scientists say.

A new editorial essay paired with results from a recent study done by reproductive health researchers say a contraception option like this could be an important way to help women regulate their reproductive functions. However, the essay says conservative opposition is holding development back and preventing such a pill for reaching the market, according to The Week.

With the difficulties post-sex birth control options have sometimes faced getting to market in the past, it is not a great surprise that a pill like this would face strong opposition. Much of this has roots in a misguided view of post-fertilization birth control methods as “bad” or “wrong,” one of the lead researchers, Elizabeth Raymond, argues. She points out that some long-lasting post-fertilization birth control options have long been on the legal market such as IUDs.

So how does it work? Unlike the “morning after” pill, also known as Plan B, which only works within a 72 hour period, the proposed new birth control pill could be taken up to a month after conception. The larger window means more women would have access to birth control, StyleCaster reports. For some women, finding a pharmacy that carries morning after pills or being able to pay for them may take more than Plan B’s three-day limit.

It would also allow women much more flexibility in the way they use birth control. The pill would only be taken once a month, regardless of how often or when a woman chooses to have sex. It could even be used after a woman has already missed her period.

Authors of the essay say that the new pill would benefit men too. They say it could eliminate the “conceptual and logistical challenge” of getting and using contraception before sex.

What do you think? Would you support this new monthly birth control pill reaching the market? Would you consider using it yourself?

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