Quantcast

Costa Concordia Cruise Ship Rises From It’s Watery Grave [Video]

The Costa Concordia cruise ship has rises from its watery grave, and the process can be seen in this new time-lapsed video.

As The Inquisitr reported earlier, after a massive and complicated salvage effort, the cruise ship Costa Concordia has been successfully righted off the coast of Italy.

The total operation took 19 hours to upright the ship from its side where it had been left for the past two years.

According to the New York Daily News, now that the boat has been up-righted, a new search for the two bodies that where never found can begin, and eventually the ship will be towed away.

The Costa Concordia originally capsized in January 2012, killing 32 people.

BBC News stated that even though this part of the project has been completed, months of work still lie ahead before it can be towed away, which could happen as soon as next spring.

“A perfect operation, I must say,” said Franco Porcellacchia, leader of the technical team for Costa Cruise, the owner of the ship.

BBC News continued on to report that Porcellacchia said no environmental spill had been detected so far – one of the main aims given the pristine waters of the marine sanctuary in which it capsized.

“I think the whole team is proud of what they achieved because a lot of people didn’t think it could be done,” said salvage master Nick Sloane.

The operation involved a synchronized effort of pulleys and counterweights to bring the vessel upright.

According to The Inquisitr, the operation involved rotating the 114-ton ship 65 degrees to bring it completely vertical.

“After bringing the ship vertical, the next step in the process was to secure water tanks to the hull in order to maintain buoyancy.”

Once the ship was finally in its upright position, cheers could be heard from all those working on the project, and from bystanders.

To watch the total operation, make sure to check out the time-lapse video of the rising of the Costa Concordia cruise ship.

[Image by Giorces via Wikimedia]