45 Bing Cherries A Day Fight Disease, Says USDA

bing cherries disease

Can just 45 sweet Bing cherries a day fight disease? The United States Department of Agriculture has been pushing the benefits of the sweet fruit from the American northwest this summer as a result of a new study that says they probably do.

According to Northwest Cherries, there have been multiple past studies that demonstrate the benefits of eating sweet cherries.

The new study conducted at the USDA Agricultural Research Service Western Human Nutrition Research Center focused on a small group of 16 women and 2 men aged 45 to 61. Those subjects had slightly elevated levels of a protein that suggested they were at risk for diseases linked to inflammation.

Dr, Kent Erickson, a University of California Davis School of Medicine who worked on the study, noted that those disease can include chronic illnesses like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and even cancer.

According to MSN Now, the subjects ate the Bing cherries for about 63 days each before they started to see reduced levels of the proteins linked to the inflammation.

That means that Bing cherries can join the lineup of other fancy and sometimes rather expensive fruits that claim to save the world or at least your life.

One of the more unusual is bitter melon. The rather well-named fruit has always been popular in Asian traditional medicine. But it has recently enjoyed some support from new studies that suggest it probably does have some cancer-fighting properties.

And there are those of us who get all of our fruit calories from the sacred grape in the form of wine. Luckily for us, some studies on a red wine ingredient known as resveratrol suggest that this antioxidant could be a key ingredient to extending the human lifespan.

But all these fancy fruits and drinks may inflate the grocery bill. Plus there’s another problem.

MSN calculated that 45 Bing cherries adds up to about 10 ounces. That’s more than half a pound of Bing cherries every single day to get the disease-fighting results.

[bing cherries photo credit: qthrul via photopin cc]