Huggies TweetPee Device Alerts Parents When Diapers Are Wet

The new Huggies TweetPee device alerts parents when a diaper is wet. The device is designed to be worn on a diaper. When the diaper is wet, the an alert message can be sent to the parent’s Twitter account.

The TweetPee device is small and oval shaped. It is painted like a blue bird, an obvious reference to the Twitter logo. An included app tracks data, such as how many diapers have been used, alerting parents when they need to shop for more.

As reported by ABC News, the device is still in early testing stages in Brazil. According to a Huggies Brazil spokesman, there are currently four families testing the Huggies TweetPee system. They plan to expand the test pool by adding six more families in early July.

A representative from Kimberly-Clark, which owns the Huggies brand, has stated that the device and system are currently in the concept stage, so the application and software cannot be downloaded.

As reported by cnet.com, the Huggies TweetPee system is is not currently available in English. The only available language, at this time, is Portuguese.

Huggies might have to find a different Twitter account, or change the name of their new product before it is offered in the US.

Strangely enough there is already someone using the name TweetPee on Twitter. In a blog, titled The Life and Streams of TweetPee, the blogger states, ” I tweet when I pee…and I’m on an all liquid diet.” As can be expected, the tweets are all focused urination habits.

TweetPee’s blog contains discussion about topics such as toilets, urinals, bathrooms, “how not to pee,” and “scientific pee-search.”

For now, the Huggies TweetPee is only available to a few parents in Brazil. Although it is an interesting and innovative idea, many parents might find the device cumbersome, as it appears to be around three inches long. Additionally, it may be easier to simply check the diaper, rather than waiting for an alert on the computer or phone.

If the Huggies TweetPee is made available in the US, parents may benefit from its use, provided that it does not replace regular diaper checks.

[Image via Flickr]