Mark Twitchell, ‘Dexter’ Killer, Allowed To Watch ‘Dexter’ In Jail

Dexter Killer

Mark Twitchell, a convicted murderer known for his M.O. which was based on that of fictional serial killer Dexter Morgan, is enjoying the Showtime series Dexter from his jail cell.

The 33-year-old aspiring filmmaker of Edmonton, Alberta, was convicted of first degree murder in the 2008 disappearance and death of John Brian “Johnny” Altinger. Twitchell had apparently lured the 38-year-old to his garage under the pretense of shooting a horror film.

The case received wide media attention, particularly over the charge that Twitchell had modeled the luring, murder and dismemberment of Altinger on the protagonist of the Dexter TV series.

Currently serving a life sentence in the maximum security wing of Saskatchewan Penitentiary, Twitchell is reportedly allowed to watch the show that arguably lit his path into the very cell he enjoys it from.

According to the National Post, Twitchell wasn’t allowed to watch the show while he awaited trial, but there are no such restrictions in his federal pen.

He bought a flat-screen TV for his private cell, and has access to over 60 cable TV channels.

In prison letters, Twitchell says he has completely caught up on Dexter since his 2008 arrest, and praises the show for its “innovative writing.”

This revelation has caused some controversy, with many wondering why Twitchell should be allowed to watch the show when it is so inextricably linked to his crime.

“It’s very upsetting because if you’re serving life for murder you shouldn’t be allowed all these little perks, especially if it’s going to keep fuelling his obsession,” said Jane Orydzuk of the Victims of Homicide Support Society.

But one criminologist says that there’s not much that can be done about Twitchell’s TV habits. “As much as people might find it reprehensible that he continues to consume this type of media, he has the legal right to consume it,” said Stacey Hannem.

For his part, Twitchell doesn’t understand why anyone would begrudge his desire to continue watching Dexter, and criticized the prison staff working with him.

“They know nothing about me,” he wrote in a letter. “They are merely bureaucrats who update my file.”

Do you think that Mark Twitchell should be allowed to watch Dexter?