President Joe Biden Indicates That Donald Trump Should Not Receive Intelligence Briefings

Since it became clear that Joe Biden would ascend to the presidency in the wake of his November victory over Donald Trump, questions have abounded regarding whether or not the latter should be eligible to receive regular intelligence briefings after leaving office. According to recent statements made by the current commander-in-chief, it would seem that the answer to those questions is no -- at least as Biden sees it.

Biden shared his opinion on the subject during a sit-down interview with CBS Evening News anchor Norah O'Donnell, of which an excerpt was tweeted by the host on Friday. In the clip, he didn't mince words when he was engaged on the possibility that his predecessor could be kept in the loop on matters of national security.

When asked directly if Trump should continue to be briefed, the president deadpanned, "I think not."

O'Donnell pressed Biden for his thought process on the matter, to which he responded by citing a track record for "erratic behavior" as cause for keeping his electoral opponent in the dark. He also questioned whether there was actually anything to be gained by allowing Trump to be briefed.

"What value is giving him an intelligence briefing?" he asked. "What impact does he have at all, other than the fact he might slip and say something?"

The president's statements were the strongest condemnation yet of Trump potentially being privy to classified information and intel as he transitions back into life as a private citizen. As noted by Politico, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki had indicated during a previous media session that Trump's access to future briefings was still under review.

Biden's latest remarks would seemingly indicate where the current administration has landed on the matter.

President Joe Biden speaks about the national economy in the State Dining Room at the White House in 2021.
Getty Images | Stefani Reynolds

In mid-January, Susan M. Gordon — who was the Trump administration's principal deputy director of national intelligence for two years — wrote an op-ed for The Washington Post espousing her opinion that the former president should not receive further intel.

She noted that modern former presidents have typically retained access to classified information in support of their continued efforts to advance the American agenda. However, as a three-decade veteran of the field, it is her belief that Trump is a special case that poses potential threats to national security.

As reported by The Inquisitr, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff went on the record expressing similar views. The California Democrat said that Trump "can't be trusted" during an appearance on Face the Nation.