1992 Cold Case Murders Lead To Arrest

New details surrounding a trio of 1992 cold case murders led to the arrest of an Oklahoma man this week. The skeletal remains of three females — declared missing more than two decades ago — were recovered from an 8-foot-deep dirt grave earlier this month, prompting police to arrest the former owner of the property where they were found.

On Thursday, Oklahoma police arrested 60-year-old Grover J. Prewitt Jr, charging him as an accessory after the fact of first-degree murder. Prewitt voluntarily alerted authorities to the location of the grave, located on property he and his late mother Ida Prewitt owned. Police have speculated that several individuals may be responsible for the murders.

The case began on May 29, 1992 with the disappearance of 23-year-old Wendy Camp, her six-year-old daughter Cynthia Britto, and Camp’s 22-year-old sister-in-law Lisa Kregear.

They were last seen by Beverly Noe, Ida Prewitt’s daughter. She claimed to have dropped the trio off at a Walmart located in Chandler, Oklahoma during a car trip.

At the time of her disappearance, Wendy Camp was reportedly engaged in a custody dispute with Chad Noe, Beverly Noe’s son. However, evidence gathered in 1992 failed to link the Noes to any foul play.

The disappearance remained a mystery, and ultimately became a cold case, until Grover Prewitt came forward with information in March.

According to police, Prewitt explained that shortly before the three females were reported missing, he owned several acres of land near Jennings that his mother was in the process of buying.

He claims that on behalf of their mother, Beverly Noe requested the commission of a backhoe to dig a substantial hole on the property. A few days after the women disappeared, Ida Prewitt asked to have the hole refilled. She never moved onto the property and later sold it to the current owners.

Grover Prewitt claims that he suspected the three females had been buried on the property, and that family members were involved with their deaths. He reportedly acknowledges that his mother asked him to spread pepper over the refilled ground in an effort to deter dogs, but denies investigating the contents of the hole.

“Grover never looked in the hole after the girls went missing because he was scared of what he would see,” court documents on the cold case reveal. “Grover said he thought Ida and Beverly killed the females.”

Once Prewitt came forward, police recovered the remains of three females from the location he described. While DNA testing will be required to truly determine the identities, clothing and personal items reported to police during the 1992 disappearance were also found in the grave.

Ida Prewitt died in September 2011, long before her son came forward with information about the cold case. However, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation is still gathering evidence into the murders and expects the 1992 cold case to end in additional arrests.