Voter Fraud ‘Kraken’ Lawyer Sidney Powell Is Sued By Dominion For $1.3 Billion

Sidney Powell speaks at a press conference.
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Former Trump campaign lawyer Sidney Powell, who received notoriety in the media for claiming that she was preparing to release the “kraken” of evidence proving voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election, is being sued for defamation by Dominion, the voting machine company she repeatedly claimed had switched votes from Donald Trump to President-elect Joe Biden.

According to Forbes, the Dominion’s decision to take legal action comes after the company had previously sent her a cease and desist letter back in December. The notice asked that she retract the “knowingly baseless” claims about its voting machines.

Powell first targeted the voting-tabulation business back on November 19, shortly after Trump’s election loss. She claimed that foreign operators from both Iran and China had hacked the computer systems to reroute votes to Biden. She also stated that Dominion had ties to late Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez’s family.

Though she filed multiple lawsuits against Dominion centering on voter fraud, they all failed in court due to lack of evidence. She was eventually dropped by the president’s circle as a result.

Nevertheless, the accusations reportedly lead to death threats and harassment against Dominion’s employees, as well as both the governor and secretary of state of Georgia, a state that was particularly fraught with voter-fraud claims.

“Lies were told about government election officials, elections workers, and Dominion Voting Systems. Those lies have consequences,” Dominion CEO John Poulos said in a statement. “Today is the first step to restore our good name and faith in elections by holding those responsible to account. We intend to pursue justice vigorously to its rightful end.”

Rudy Giuliani points to a map as he speaks to the press about various lawsuits with Sidney Powell.
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Dominion is seeking $1.3 billion in damages, and Poulos has not ruled out targeting others who promoted false information about the company.

“We’re looking at everybody…every actor that has made these types of false allegations about us, and also the news media outlets that have allowed these allegations to be amplified, unfettered and unchecked,” Poulos told Axios on Monday, who defended his business by citing the 18 years it had operated without issue.

“The level of falsity just reached the level that I had not previously thought would ever be possible,” he added.

The CEO is not the first person associated with Dominion to resort to legal action. Employee Eric Coomer filed a suit in December against the president’s campaign, Powell, Rudy Giuliani, and other allies. The case is currently pending.

Meanwhile, the White House is reportedly concerned about legal issues of its own after staffers were warned that the president could potentially face serious consequences following Wednesday’s riots, per The Inquisitr.