Donald Trump’s Promise To ‘Never Come Back’ To Michigan Resurfaces After State Called For Joe Biden

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks on election night in the East Room of the White House in the early morning hours of November 04, 2020 in Washington, DC.
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Donald Trump’s previous vow to “never come back” to Michigan if he loses the presidential election has re-surfaced after the state was called for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Wednesday.

“It puts much more pressure on me running against a guy like this, you know. If you lost to somebody that was good — can you imagine, the concept of losing to this guy?” he said in Grand Rapids on Monday, per Business Insider.

“Oh, you better get out there and vote tomorrow, or I will be so angry. I’ll never come back to Michigan. I’ll never come back. I’ll tell Japan to bring all those plants the hell back.”

Many took to Twitter to comment on the president’s remark.

“Congrats, Michigan,” artist Brandon Bird tweeted.

“As a Minnesotan, this is the outcome of the election I’m most thankful for,” another user wrote.

“Too bad he didn’t make the same deal with DC,” another user joked.

As The Inquisitr reported, The New York Times called Michigan for Biden. But shortly after, Trump claimed that state as his own along with Pennsylvania, Georgia, and North Carolina. Nevertheless, The New York Times showed Biden securing 16 electoral votes with 2,684,200 ballots to the president’s 2,617,060. Libertarian candidate Jo Jorgensen gained 59,029 ballots in the region, which is also home to the first-ever Libertarian congressman, Justin Amash.

The Trump campaign doesn’t appear ready to let Michigan go. As reported by CBC, manager Bill Stepien released a statement Wednesday and claimed that they were not allowed “meaningful access to numerous counting locations” to observe ballot counting, which he noted is guaranteed by Michigan law.

U.S President Donald Trump looks on during a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in in the Oval Office of the White House on June 30, 2017 in Washington, DC.
  Olivier Douliery / Getty Images

The comment comes amid the campaign’s lawsuit against the state, which is intended to halt the vote count. Justin Clark, Trump’s deputy campaign manager, said the legal action was designed to counter alleged fraud enacted by Democratic officials.

Although Trump lead Michigan early on, the first votes on Election Day were predicted by some to begin red in certain regions — also referred to as the “Red Mirage,” — before tilting or becoming blue. According to CBC, Democrats traditionally outperform Republicans in mail-in voting. Throughout his presidency, the president has criticized the integrity of the process and suggested that Democrats would use it to rig the process in their favor.

As The Inquisitr reported, mail-in votes are part of every United States referendum. However, the coronavirus pandemic has led to an unprecedented number of ballots via this process, and many states were unprepared for the switch.