Donald Trump And Nancy Pelosi Haven’t Spoken For A Year

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Mike Pence look on as U.S. President Donald Trump delivers the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives at the U.S. Capitol Building on February 5, 2019 in Washington, DC.
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Donald Trump and Nancy Pelosi haven’t spoken to each other in a full year, according to The Hill.

“I don’t speak to the president. I speak to his representative,” Pelosi said this week.

The last time two of the most powerful people in Washington D.C. chatted was during a meeting at the White House exactly one year ago. At the time, there reports that the president slammed Pelosi, reportedly calling her a “third rate” or “third grade” political leader. The conversation reportedly degenerated from there.

After leaving the meeting, critics accused the House leader of being condescending to Trump when she said that Americans need to “pray for his health, because this was a very serious meltdown on the part of the president,” as The Hill reported.

She also accused Trump of being too close with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The chilly relationship has been evident over the past year as both politicians have continued to make disparaging comments about each other. She has called him “morbidly obese” while discussing his health and has urged his family to intervene in his behavior.

Trump has criticized the House leader’s mental health, calling her “sick” and “crazy.” He has also called her a “waste of time.”

That hasn’t stopped Pelosi from working across the aisle to pass legislation, often in collaboration with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

She has claimed that she’s found it challenging to deal with the president directly because he is inconsistent. For example, over the past 10 days, he has changed his mind about how to proceed with a coronavirus stimulus package on three occasions. Initially, he said negotiations were over until the election, but a day later called on Congress to pass a lighter package, as The Inquisitr previously reported.

“Quite frankly, my experience with the president has been that it hasn’t been on the level. You know, he’ll say something and then it doesn’t really happen. So in the interest of time, we’ll work with who he sends over,” Pelosi explained.

House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (L) holds up the ripped up copy of President Donald Trump's speech after the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on February 04, 2020 in Washington, DC.
  Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Some, including Democratic Representative Dean Phillips from Minnesota, have said that the broken relationship between the Pelosi and Trump is evidence of a broader issue in Washington — the impact of partisanship amongst lawmakers.

“It’s a sad commentary on the circumstances of our governance,” he said. “The more that politics becomes kind of a brutal sport rather than a public service, the more trouble we’re going to be in. We’re seeing the evidence of that right now.”

While having an adversarial relationship isn’t unusual among political leaders from different sides of the aisle, most have at least found ways to directly communicate.