North Korea Nuclear Status Denied As Test’s Radioactive Isotopes Found

North Korea’s nuclear status has been denied by the United States. This news comes at the same time as evidence showing the North Korea nuclear test is producing radioactive isotopes comes to light.

As previously reported by The Inquisitr, the North Korea missile test would have a range of over 2,000 miles and place the US island of Guam within striking distance. The United States and Japan offered North Korea nuclear talks, and North Korea responded by demanding nuclear status. China already admits another North Korea nuclear test is possible.

North Korea promised nuclear war against the United States and some wonder whether North Korea’s nuclear weapons capabilities are being underestimated. Some experts believe America would be in danger from a North Korean EMP attack and not a standard nuclear missile. To make matters worse, two North Korean submarines are allegedly missing, but fortunately they are short range mid-sized submarines intended to patrol the coasts.

The United States is rejecting the regime of Kim Jong-Un’s demand that the US admit North Korea its nuclear status, saying, “North Korea’s demand to be recognized as a nuclear weapons state is neither realistic nor acceptable.”

In response, North Korea is rejecting the idea that dismantling its nuclear weapons and missile launchers must be a condition for beginning serious talks. North Korea said this via a North-run newspaper:

“If the [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea] sits at a table with the U.S., it has to be a dialogue between nuclear weapons states, not one side forcing the other to dismantle nuclear weapons.”

The third underground North Korean nuclear test in February produced about half the explosive power of the bombs dropped on Hiroshima. A United Nation monitoring agency in Japan saying the North Korea nuclear test’s radioactive isotopes have been detected 600 miles from the nuclear test site. Even in Russia they have picked up “significant” traces of noble gases that accompany a nuclear explosion, including two types of xenon radioactive isotopes.

Do you think the US should attempt talks despite North Korea’s nuclear status being a reality?