Donald Trump Mocked For Warning ‘Jobs Will Disappear’ Under Joe Biden After Record Job Losses On His Watch

Donald Trump speaks in an Oval Office statement.
CHIP SOMODEVILLA / Getty Images

Donald Trump is coming under fire after making a claim that “jobs will disappear” under Joe Biden, with many pointing out that there have already been record-shattering job losses under the president’s watch.

Trump took to Twitter on Saturday to make the claim against the presumptive Democratic opponent, warning that there would be dire economic consequences if Biden were to win the election in November. The tweet — which you can view here — started with the president quoting a statement that taxes would be raised by $3 trillion under his opponent, and he then pivoted to a claim that the economic devastation would be even more widespread than tax increases alone.

“Actually, it will be much more than that, and much of it on nonsense,” he wrote. “Markets and your 401k’s will CRASH. Jobs will disappear!”

As The Huffington Post noted, the tweet drew a sharp reaction from many who pointed out that the U.S. economy has already seen the sort of crash that Trump was describing. Users struck a mocking tone as they chided Trump for apparently being out of touch with the widespread impact of the coronavirus on employment in the United States.

“You already crashed the economy, bud,” tweeted the organization Meidas Touch, which has flooded social media with videos mocking the president.

As The Washington Post noted in a report this week, the economic dive has shattered records. The U.S. economy contracted by 9.5 percent from April through June, the fastest quarterly drop in gross domestic product since the implementation of modern record-keeping.

While Trump may be hitting his opponent with claims that he would be a job-killer for the United States if elected, many have blamed Trump himself for the severity of the current crash. The federal government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic has come under sharp scrutiny, with many blaming Trump directly for a failure to implement national testing standards or require social distancing measures, including a mask mandate.

Many experts have warned that there could be more damage ahead.

“We’re still digging out of a hole, a really deep hole,” Ben Herzon, executive director of IHS Markit, told the Washington Post. “The second-quarter figure will just tell us the size of the hole we’re digging out of, and it’s a big one.”

Trump has struck a more optimistic tone, saying this week that cases were coming down in many of the states that have seen recent surges, like Florida and Arizona. He has also touted growth in jobs.