Kris Bryant Says Opting To Not Play In 2020 ‘Runs Through A Lot Of Peoples’ Minds,’

Kris Bryant of the Chicago Cubs draws a walk against the Seattle Mariners
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Kris Bryant understands the anger and frustration felt by many over the way Major League Baseball has dealt with the players and coaches in starting the 2020 season back up. He also understands that several players are considering joining those who have opted out or elected not to play this season at all. The Chicago Cubs third baseman sat down for an interview with beat reporter Jordan Bastian for the writer’s official blog and said that he thinks not taking part in this season “runs through a lot of peoples’ minds.”

“I just do everything I can here to… It feels bad, but I try to stay away from my teammates as much as possible,” Bryant said. “I think if we’re going to want this thing to work, we have to really do that, and I try to lead by example out there and wear my mask as much as possible. But, at the same time, getting baseball work in.”

He added that not playing this season went through his mind. Bryant said he goes home every day and wonders what would happen if he were to contract the coronavirus at camp and then bring it back to his wife and new son. He added there are many different things that can go wrong.

Kris Bryant of the Chicago Cubs throws the baseball during summer workouts at Wrigley Field
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Bryant said that, while he’s worried about the possibility of infecting his family with the coronavirus, he’s trying to stay positive. He also said he’s just trying to stay healthy and make sure he can help his family and his teammates as much as possible.

Bryant was careful throughout the interview to make it clear that he understands that the Cubs players and other people in baseball have things better than the average fan around the country. At the same time, he expressed his anger and frustration over difficulties that struck the league shortly after teams reported to their respective ballparks to begin spring training.

“I think it’s appropriate to talk about our situation here and what we agreed to was testing every other day. And we’ve had guys here that showed up on Sunday and hadn’t gotten tested again seven days later, you know? And then you don’t get the results for two days, either. So, that’s nine days without knowing.”

Bryant added that if Major League Baseball wants its endeavors in 2020 to succeed, it is going to need to find a way to fix those testing issues quickly. He also described the earlier stages as the “easy part,” and he’s worried what’s going to happen when teams go out on the road and are spending time at hotels.