Lori Loughlin May Find It Difficult To Find Work Again After Prison Sentence, Public Relations Expert Suggests

'Hollywood tends to be pretty forgiving if it's a nonviolent crime,' said public relations expert Cherie Kerr.

Lori Loughlin smiles at the camera.
Jerod Harris / Getty Images

'Hollywood tends to be pretty forgiving if it's a nonviolent crime,' said public relations expert Cherie Kerr.

Cherie Kerr, a public relations expert, gave her take on whether or not embattled actress Lori Loughlin will be able to work again after doing prison time for her role in the college admissions scandal. It was revealed on Thursday that Loughlin, as well as her husband Mossimo Giannulli, have agreed to plead guilty for their role in the case, according to Fox News.

Loughlin’s reputation has been affected by this high profile case. While this does not necessarily mean she will never be able to land an acting gig again in the future — or manage to repair her appearance — it is certainly not going to be easy.

“Hollywood tends to be pretty forgiving if it’s a nonviolent crime and also it depends on the times we’re living in. We’re in a time where there’s a lot of cheating and a lot of corruption and things going on that are very telling about people,” Kerr said.

Nevertheless, there are a lot of elements involved in this case that could potentially impact how Loughlin is viewed moving forward. In addition to paying $500,000 in bribery funds to Rick Singer, the mastermind of the scheme, she also tried to falsely present her daughters as crew recruits. This act of deception, Kerr explained, will cause Loughlin to be looked at as untrustworthy.

“She didn’t fight it and get off and even if she had, there was a lot of damage done. It’s generally not just one thing, but I think her career and her image is tainted from here on out because of what happened.”

Kerr went on to say that, because of this scandal, Loughlin will not be viewed as a good mother — which will serve as a major strike against her career wise. Per the public relations expert, Loughlin’s best chance for clearing her name will be to offer up some sort of explanation as to her motives, and apologize.

Loughlin is expected to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud. This could result in two months of prison time, a $150,000 fine, two years of supervised release, and 100 hours of community service. Meanwhile, Giannulli is expected to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud and to honest services wire and mail fraud. He could ostensibly spend five months behind bars, be required to pay a $250,000 fine, and complete 250 hours of community service, as The Inquisitr previously reported.

The couple’s daughters, Olivia Jade and Isabella, are not currently being charged in connection to the case.