‘Jane Roe’ Norma McCorvey Reveals Christian Right Paid Her For Fake Pro-Life Conversion In Deathbed Confession

Norma McCorvey, also known as Jane Roe in the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, reads a statement March 15, 2000 in Washington DC. Roe v. Wade was a landmark case that made abortion legal in the United States.
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Norma McCorvey, who was named “Jane Roe” in the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court Roe v. Wade case that made abortion legal in the United States, revealed that she was paid to fake her conversion to the anti-abortion movement, Reuters reported. McCorvey revealed the bombshell as part of an FX documentary called AKA Jane Roe.

“I took their money, and they took me out in front of the cameras and told me what to say,” she said during the film. “I did it well too. I am a good actress. Of course, I’m not acting now. If a young woman wants to have an abortion, that’s no skin off my a**. That’s why they call it choice.”

In 2017, the footage was filmed during the final months of McCorvey’s life, and she died in Texas at the age of 69. She revealed that over the years, she received more than $450,000 to speak about her s0-called conversion to the pro-life movement. While she said the movement used her as a trophy, she admitted that she used them for the money.

In the documentary, Rev. Robert Schenck, who worked with McCorvey after she converted to Christianity, watched her deathbed confession and seemed surprised. However, he also admitted that she had been paid for her appearances on behalf of the anti-abortion movement.

“What we did with Norma was highly unethical,” Schenck said in the documentary. “The jig is up.”

In a blog post, the reverend said that he regretted how he helped mistreat McCorvey, and he noted how her appearances garnered huge donations that were nowhere near the small amount of money she received to speak on behalf of the anti-abortion movement. He said that this documentary bares not only McCorvey’s soul but also his own. Schenck also said he felt it was important that the woman, once known as Jane Roe, told her story in her own words.

The minister also revealed that he played a role in urging McCorvey to break up with her partner, Connie Gonzalez, by telling her that homosexuality was a sin. Still, he admitted that the part he played in the couple’s breakup was among his worst ever sins.

“I hope you’ll watch AKA Jane Roe. It will reveal the true person behind the propaganda—and so much more, perhaps even something about yourself,” wrote Schenck.

AKA Jane Roe premieres on FX Network and Hulu on Friday, May 22, at 9 p.m. Eastern. The film is by filmmaker Nick Sweeney and stars Jon Voight and Stacey Dash.