Former MLB Player Aubrey Huff Tweets Theory That Coronavirus Is Just A Cover For Doomsday Asteroid

Aubrey Huff in a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers
Christian Petersen / Getty Images

Former MLB player Aubrey Huff recently tried to start a coronavirus conspiracy on Twitter, claiming the virus was only a distraction for a world-ending asteroid that is headed for Earth in a few weeks. However, he later explained that the tweet was meant to show how gullible people can be.

Various conspiracy theories have popped up during the COVID-19 pandemic, as people have been forced to stay home and practice extreme social distancing to slow the spread of the disease. Huff — who played 13 seasons in the MLB and won two World Series with the San Francisco Giants — has shared several strong takes on social media during the outbreak.

As reported by SportsGossip, Huff deliberately tried to incite his followers on Sunday, tweeting a conspiracy theory that claimed all of the orders from the government to have citizens shelter in place were simply to stop hysteria over a giant asteroid that was headed for Earth. He claimed this strategy helped force families to spend their last days together.

“I just heard from a credible source that works @CNN & he said, there is a doomsday asteroid that will hit us in 3 weeks. Nothing we can do. So this #coronavirus was released to use as an excuse to keep people from panicking & #stayhome with their families in these final days.”

There was a lot of backlash in the replies to this since-deleted tweet. The next day, the 43-year-old walked back the “doomsday” claim with another tweet. In this follow-up post, he said the responses proved that people believe whatever they are told, thus explaining how the U.S. ended up in quarantine.

“This tweet just proves many people will believe anything they read,” the former outfielder wrote. “Do your own research.”

Huff received more backlash for this clarification as many Twitter users pointed out that no one fell for his hoax.

“Pretty sure nobody believed this,” one user responded.

“Nobody believed you dumba**,” another wrote.

One person on Twitter accused the two-time World Series champion of trying to upset liberals.

“Translated from: I’m a known dumb f*ck that tweeted nonsense to own the libs,” they replied.

“Someone get this dude off the Internet,” a user suggested.

Huff is not the only former pro athlete to drop conspiracy theories amid the COVID-19 crisis. Larry Johnson, a former NFL running back, shared a theory that celebrities such as Charles Barkley and Tom Hanks had used the illness as a smokescreen to hide the fact they had been arrested for alleged child abuse.