Turner Classic Movies Is Bringing Its Movie Festival To Home Television Screens Due To Coronavirus

While the film festival has been canceled, a special home edition will be available for viewing.

TCM Primetime Host Ben Mankiewicz speaks during the Hand and Footprint Ceremony: Billy Crystal at the 2019 10th Annual TCM Classic Film Festival.
Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

While the film festival has been canceled, a special home edition will be available for viewing.

The 11th Annual Turner Classic Movies Film Festival was scheduled to take place in Hollywood between April 16 to April 19. Due to the novel coronavirus, the film festival was originally canceled. Now TCM is bringing the festival to the comfort of viewers’ homes with a special home edition, according to ABC News.

The idea was first sparked by Pola Changnon, the network’s general manager. Within two days of her initial proposal to do something to recognize the event over the mid-April weekend, Charles Tabash, the head of programming, suggested something much bigger. His idea includes three-and-a-half days of TCM films, special guests, and replays of segments with notable celebrities from past film festivals.

Starting with George Cukor’s A Star Is Born at 8 p.m. ET on April 16 and ending with Blake Edwards’ Victor/Victoria at 3:30 a.m. ET on April 20, the network plans to broadcast an extensive program filled with favorites, according to the TCM website. Julie Andrews was even supposed to attend the screening of Victor/Victoria at this year’s film festival.

Naturally, all-time favorites like Casablanca, Singin’ In The Rain, and Lawrence Of Arabia are scheduled to air. Movies with stars like Marylin Monroe in Some Like It Hot and The Beatles in A Hard Day’s Night will also air. The star-studded, in-depth interviews scheduled to air include segments featuring film legends such as Faye Dunaway, Eva Marie Saint, and Luise Rainer. The special edition film festival at home includes something for everyone with movies that range from family-friendly to date night.

“It represents not only the breadth of what we might have done on a festival weekend but is also a great scrapbook of moments from the 10 years we’ve done this,” Changnon said to ABC News.

If the lineup of movies was not enough for viewers, the network was able to film several segments with director Peter Bogdanovich, who also recorded his thoughts and stories regarding Casablanca.

“Peter talking about Orson Welles is worth the price of admission,” said TCM host Ben Mankiewicz.

The original theme for the Classic Film Festival this year was set to be “grand illusions” and “fantastic worlds.” Though the festival itself will not happen as planned, the staff at TCM has worked diligently to create a schedule of movies that embody both the network and this year’s theme. Mankiewicz has even said he has been working until nearly 3 a.m. to write scripts as the staff tries to prepare everything in time to air in April.