North Korea Nuclear War Threatened, DoD Says Missiles Could Hit US Mainland

North Korea Nuclear War Threatened, DoD Says Missiles Could Hit US Mainland

North Korea declared a state of war against South Korea. Included in this document was the stated intention by North Korea to launch a nuclear war against the United States.

As previously reported by The Inquisitr, the North Korea UN sanctions situation has been deteriorating for a while now. North Korea claims to have long range missiles and nuclear weapons, and an EMP attack against the United States might be a real threat.

North Korea’s state of war was declared in a statement:

“From this time on, the North-South relations will be entering the state of war and all issues raised between the North and the South will be handled accordingly. The long-standing situation of the Korean peninsula being neither at peace nor at war is finally over.”

North Korea also claims the war “will not be limited to a local war, but develop into an all-out war, a nuclear war.” The blame the United States for showing off its nuclear weapons-capable B-2A stealth bombers. The regime of Kim Jong-un says any conflict in the “Korean Peninsula is bound to lead to an all-out war, a nuclear war now that even U.S. nuclear strategic bombers in its military bases in the Pacific including Hawaii and Guam and in its mainland are flying into the sky above south Korea to participate in the madcap DPRK-targeted nuclear war moves.”

North Korea’s threat of nuclear war is not all bluff. In December, North Korean scientists launched a satellite into space on the back of a long-range rocket, which could be converted into a missile. In February, for the third time they tested an underground nuclear device that shook the world enough that geologists could detect it. Estimates put the nuclear bomb’s power between six to seven kilotons, which is about half the output of the nuclear weapon dropped on Hiroshima.

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White House deputy press spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters the “bellicose rhetoric emanating from North Korea only deepens that nation’s isolation.” Still, North Korea’s state of war did cause Admiral James Winnefeld, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to leak out the fact that the Department of Defense believes North Korea had one type of missile capable of reaching the US mainland. Still, experts believe these missiles are untested, may not be all too accurate (although any nuclear explosion going off anywhere in the US would be damaging), and the furthest target they’re known to be capable of hitting is Japan.

Despite these threats of nuclear war, the North Korea leaders in Pyongyang are likely aiming to force the United States to the negotiating table, pressure the new president in Seoul to change policy on North Korea, and build unity inside the communist country without triggering a full-blown war. North Korea no longer has Chinese troops stationed to back them up, while South Korea has tens of thousands of American troops ready for war. North Korea likely desires a real peace treaty that see these forces removed.