Italian Mayors Are Taking To Social Media To Berate Their Residents For Not Social Distancing

'We will send police with flame throwers,' one angry mayor raged.

A doctor gets out of an ICU ambulance during the transportation of the first patient affected by COVID-19.
Emanuele Cremaschi / Getty Images

'We will send police with flame throwers,' one angry mayor raged.

Mayors of Italian cities are taking to social media to rage, scream, threaten, and curse at their constituents who are ignoring orders to stay inside during the coronavirus pandemic, National Post reports.

Italy has been the country hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic. As of this writing, the European country has seen 6,000 deaths amid 63,000 cases, according to Worldometers.

The country is on a nationwide lockdown and residents are ordered to not leave their homes except for essential travel, such as going to purchase food or to get medical care.

While most Italians are obeying the laws, there are a good number of people who are not. Some are openly flouting them, while others are finding creative ways to get around them. Indeed, the problem is so pervasive that police have fined 40,000 people in the first week of the national lockdown.

The country’s mayors are having none of it. On national TV and on social media, the politicians are sparing no ire for their constituents who are not taking the quarantine orders seriously.

Vincenzo De Luca, the president of Campania, did not mince words when he heard that some of his constituents were planning on throwing graduation parties.

“We will send police. With flame-throwers,” he said.

In Reggio Calabria, Mayor Massimiliano Presciutti isn’t buying the excuse that residents need to get out of the house to walk their dogs.

“Where the f*ck are you all going? You and your dogs… which must have an inflamed prostate?” he said, further noting that he had spoken directly to one dog-walker, telling him that he is not Will Smith.

In Lucera, Mayor Antonio Tutolo is frustrated with people who obey the letter of the law by not going to the hair salon, but then violate the law’s intention by going into a mobile hairdressing van to get their ‘do. He noted that a pretty hairdo will probably go to the grave with its wearer and no one will see it anyway.

“What the f*ck is that for? Who the f*ck is supposed to even see you with your hair all done in a casket? Do you understand the casket will be closed?” he said.

Italy has been hit particularly hard by the coronavirus pandemic, for a host of reasons that will likely be studied by epidemiologists for years. As previously reported by The Inquisitr, one possible reason the virus has been so rampant in that country is that it — like Spain, who has also been hit hard by the pandemic — has a culture that values communal gatherings and affectionate, close personal contact.