Legal Expert Explains Why Lori Loughlin Will Be Risking It All If Her Case Goes To Trial

If Lori Loughlin is convicted after her case goes to trial, she will not be in any 'position to make any demands about the ultimate sentence,' explained attorney Edward Molari.

Lori Loughlin poses on the red carpet.
Charley Gallay / Getty Images

If Lori Loughlin is convicted after her case goes to trial, she will not be in any 'position to make any demands about the ultimate sentence,' explained attorney Edward Molari.

Criminal defense attorney Edward Molari is giving his take on why Lori Loughlin will be essentially risking everything if her case does, in fact, go to trial and she does not take a plea deal. As he explained to Hollywood Life, if the case goes to trial, Loughlin will forego any chance she might have to request changes to her sentencing.

Both Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli have pleaded not guilty to all the charges stacked against them in regard to their role in the college admissions scandal. Although the couple might be looking at going to trial as the only way to clear their names, avoid jail, and save their reputation, it could cost them big in the end.

Essentially, the couple will be in no position to make any sort of demands in regard to their potential sentencing if they are convicted. They will also not get any of the leniency that they might have enjoyed if they had taken a plea deal and accepted responsibility as many parents before them have done in connection to the cheating scandal.

“If she does go to trial she will forgo a reduction in her guidelines sentence for acceptance of responsibility. Going to trial also means that if you are convicted you are not in a position to make any demands about the ultimate sentence,” Molari explained.

Molari referenced a case similar to that of Loughlin’s and Giannulli’s, which is that of David Sidoo’s. Sidoo pleaded guilty to paying $200,000 in bribery funds in order to get his sons into college. He has already agreed to a sentence that has been laid out for him, which is 90 days in prison and a $250,000 fine. While this sentence might not sound light, it is likely a lot lighter of a sentence than he would have been given if he had not taken the deal.

Loughlin and Giannulli are accused of even more significant crimes than Sidoo, thus it can be determined that if they are convicted following a trial, their sentence will be far harsher.

Despite concerns that the couple’s trial will be delayed due to the coronavirus, a judge has ordered that it will take place in October of 2020 as planned, as The Inquisitr previously reported.

Molari weighed in regarding any possible delay.

“Federal courts are taking steps to reduce contact, including continuing jury trials scheduled to begin before April 27th. Since her trial is not scheduled until October it seems unlikely that the Coronavirus will affect her case,” he said.