‘Frozen’ Star Josh Gad Will Be Doing Live Readings Of Bedtime Stories To Calm Anxious Children

Every night, Josh Gad will be doing a live reading of a bedtime story on Twitter to help calm anxious children stuck at home during the pandemic.

Josh Gad smiles at the camera.
Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images

Every night, Josh Gad will be doing a live reading of a bedtime story on Twitter to help calm anxious children stuck at home during the pandemic.

Every night, actor Josh Gad is doing live readings of bedtime stories which will be streamed on his Twitter page. This is a unique way that he has found to help anxious children who are stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic and who are likely scared and confused, according to Tank’s Good News.

Gad, who is famous for being the voice of Olaf in the hit movie Frozen, announced his plan for the readings last week, telling parents that he hopes this small gesture will help both them and their children. The very first book he chose to read was Olivia Goes to Venice by Ian Falconer, and he showed off his acting skills by doing the voice of each individual character.

“I’ll try to provide at least 10 minutes of daycare to you and your families a night while we’re going through this unprecedented global event… I love you all. I’m hoping you’re all healthy and safe, wherever you are, and hopefully, I will see you all very soon. Take care,” he said.

Gad has two young daughters himself, including 9-year-old Ava and 6-year-old Isabella. Thus, he can relate to the many parents around the world who have suddenly found themselves in scenarios they have never faced before. Instead of going to work, many are likely wrapping up the first full week of homeschooling their children after school systems across many states shut down for the foreseeable future, according to The Inquisitr.

Gad has struggled with feeling as if he did not have the answers he wished he had to comfort his daughters, nor was he able to take away the suffering of many throughout the nation. However, he realized there was something he could do to, at the very least, provide some stress relief. He already reads to his daughters every night to help them relax and thought that maybe this was something that could help other children as well.

Thus far, Gad’s readings have been received with much positivity and gratitude. He is in turn grateful to be helping others.

“Grateful it is touching so many people and giving folks 20 minutes respite from the grind that is the constant barrage of horrible updates that we are getting on these devices right now,” he said.

He noted that the simple act of reading a book has helped him personally as well, as it has served as a distraction from everything going on around the world. It’s also kept him off his phone and away from the news.