Donald Trump’s Doctor Says He Tricked The President Into Eating Vegetables By Hiding Them In His Food

U.S. President Donald Trump President Trump speaks to reporters on the topic of Roger Stone, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA), and 2020 presidential candidates, after signing the Supporting Veterans in STEM Careers Act the Oval office at the White House on February 11, 2020 in Washington, DC.
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Donald Trump’s former White House doctor Ronny Jackson recently revealed that he and his staff used to hide vegetables in his meals in order to trick him into eating a healthier diet. Jackson, who is running for Congress, spoke with The New York Times recently, recalling that he wanted to help improve the president’s eating habits, so he and his staff would stuff vegetables into his mashed potatoes.

That’s not the only thing that they did to try and improve Trump’s health. He said that they also hid the ice cream in the White House so that the president wouldn’t be able to grab it.

Jackson made headlines when he said that Trump was so healthy and had such “great genes” that he might live 200 years, but behind the scenes, he was pressing for the president to lose 10 to 15 pounds. Originally, the doctor revealed that Trump weighed 239 pounds.

He hoped to push fitness by bringing in an exercise bike or elliptical machine to the White House, but that plan never took off. When the next physical came around, Trump had allegedly gained four pounds.

“The exercise stuff never took off as much as I wanted it to,” he said. “But we were working on his diet. We were making the ice cream less accessible, we were putting cauliflower into the mashed potatoes.”

Jackson left the White House after a scandal over his conduct in 2018. He was initially planning to serve as secretary of Veterans Affairs but withdrew his nomination after the scandal. The lifelong Army physician, who retired from the military in 2019, is now using his former ties to Trump to champion his bid for a seat in Texas’ 13th Congressional District.

Jackson denied the past allegations — which involved rumors that he had dispensed strong drugs to lawmakers — that he had done anything wrong while serving as Trump’s physician.

“I saw the ugly side of Washington,” he said of the controversy. “I got promoted in the White House, I maintained my clearance, I stayed in the military, I retired as a Navy admiral. Come on.”

Jackson, who became friends with the president while working for him, said that he feels as though his major failing was to not get him to adhere to a better health plan.

“One of his regrets was moving on from his post as White House physician before he could help institute the diet and exercise regimen he had planned for the president,” The New York Times reports.

Trump, who famously dislikes vegetables, made a trip to India this week and was slated to eat meals primarily composed of veggies, raising questions about how he would deal with the country’s traditional fare.