Asked If She Would Pick An ‘Adoring’ V.P. Like Mike Pence, Elizabeth Warren Says, ‘I Already Have A Dog’

Elizabeth Warren appears at a campaign rally.
Scott Olson / Getty Images

Elizabeth Warren seemingly doesn’t want a lap dog for a vice president.

As she was hitting the campaign trail in New Hampshire on Sunday ahead of Tuesday’s primary, the Massachusetts senator was asked by a voter who she might pick to be her vice president, and if it would be someone who looked at her adoringly and unquestioningly, as Mike Pence does with Donald Trump.

“I already have a dog,” Warren replied in an exchange shared on Twitter by Washington Post reporter Annie Linskey. Warren then joked to the crowd that they had to watch out for “feisty” women.

The exchange attracted some viral attention, with video of the exchange racking up tens of thousands of views. The line seemed to go over very well with the crowd at her rally as well, attracting laughter and some loud applause.

There was more to Warren’s answer after the joke, as she addressed what she would look for in a running mate. When considering candidates for vice president and for members of her cabinet, Warren said she would look for people who strongly believe in public service and would be good partners in her fight. They would also be willing to use whatever tools they had at their disposal on behalf of the public.

Warren said that some find it easy to blame Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and say he “ruins everything,” but she believed there was a lot that her administration could do to overcome any obstructionism from the other party and still implement their agenda.

As the exchange this weekend showed, Warren has taken an aggressive stance as she aims to make her mark in the New Hampshire primary. Warren turned in a better-than-expected showing in the Iowa caucus, coming in a close third behind Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders, but has dropped behind the race front-runners in a series of recent polls.

In recent appearances, Warren has pitched to voters that she could serve as a “unity” candidate with the ability to bring all factions of the Democratic Party together in November.

“I’ve been building a campaign from the beginning that’s not a campaign that’s narrow,” Warren said in what was interpreted as a dig at the Sanders campaign, which has been criticized as divisive.

“Not a campaign that says, ‘It’s us and nobody else. It’s a campaign that says, ‘Come on in,’ because we are in this fight together. This fight is our fight.”