Jeffrey Epstein Suicide Explanation Has ‘Too Many Inconsistencies,’ Says Former US. Attorney

A protest group called "Hot Mess" hold up signs of Jeffrey Epstein in front of the Federal courthouse on July 8, 2019 in New York City.
Stephanie Keith / Getty Images

A recent CBS’s 60 Minutes segment revealed disturbing new photos of the body of accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein and the orange sheets he allegedly used to hang himself. In the wake of the segment, former Utah U.S. Attorney Brett Tolman appeared on Fox News‘s Fox & Friends on Tuesday to express his doubt over the suicide explanation that has been tied to Epstein’s death.

According to Tolman, there are too many gaps and inconsistencies to label the case a definitive suicide, which he believes prosecutors are eager to do in the wake of the New York City Medical Examiner’s Office ruling.

“It may be a while before we are able to put this to bed…and, this just makes it even more difficult,” Tolman said.

Tolman believes that the key to the mystery lies with the two guards working at the time of Epstein’s death, both of whom were indicted on charges of falsifying records and conspiracy.

“It may seem like they are the scapegoats, and — in some ways — they are. But, they are the only ones that can piece together what occurred in those moments: why the body was moved against protocol, why there were so many monumental failures…”

Noting his experience as a prosecutor, Tolman said that he would be “really concerned” about some of the facts presented in the case. Tolman said that his approach to such facts would be to “flush” them out with witnesses or “apply the pressure” to get such witnesses to talk to determine if there’s “anything more” happening.

“Because we want to know, when you have the highest-profile criminal defendant and you have the largest budget of any agency in the Department of Justice…you can’t keep him safe?”

Dr. Michael Baden has also cast doubt on Epstein’s alleged suicide and reaffirmed his beliefs during the 60 Minutes broadcast. Baden pointed to the broken bones in Epstein’s neck, suggesting that such injuries were not common in suicides by hanging and were more frequently found in homicidal strangulation cases.

According to Baden, he has never seen anything similar to the three fractures Epstein suffered in the over 1,000 jail hangings and suicides in the New York City state prisons he visited during the past 40 to 50 years.

As The Inquisitr previously reported, no surveillance video showed Epstein’s reported suicide, which has further fueling theories that the convicted sex offender was murdered. In addition, numerous New York City officials have reportedly pushed for answers and suggested that the circumstances of Epstein’s death are suspicious.


If you or someone you know is in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741741. For readers outside the U.S., visit Suicide.org or Befrienders Worldwide for international resources you can use to find help.