Donald Trump Impeachment Nears Majority Support In Multiple Polls In What Could Signify ‘Danger Zone’

Several polls released over the past week indicate that public support for impeaching President Trump is nearing a majority.

U.S. President Donald Trump gives pauses to answer a reporters' question about a whistleblower as he leaves the Oval Office after hosting the ceremonial swearing in of Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia at the White House September 30, 2019.
Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Several polls released over the past week indicate that public support for impeaching President Trump is nearing a majority.

Several polls released over the past week indicate growing support among the public for the impeachment of the president. The increase follows a whistleblower who reported President Donald Trump asked on a July call that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and the announcement of an official impeachment inquiry into the president’s behavior.

On Monday, NBC News White House correspondent Geoff Bennett tweeted that the president had, according to sources, told members of his administration he would worry about losing support from members of his own Republican Party should public support for his impeachment reach 50 percent. While it hasn’t quite reached that number, support is growing.

As Yahoo! News noted, the questions asked in the individual polls varied from supporting the House of Representatives’ impeachment inquiry to supporting Trump’s impeachment and removal from office. No matter the question, though, polls trended toward more members of the public supporting efforts to impeach the president.

Polls released from CBS News, Reuters/Ipsos, CNN, Quinnipiac, and Monmouth University all show an increase in public support of impeachment. The Reuters poll found that 45 percent of Americans believe the president should be impeached, a CNN poll found that 47 percent of Americans support the president’s removal from office, the Quinnipiac poll found that the same percent supported Trump’s removal, and 44 percent in the Monmouth poll said the president should be impeached.

As Yahoo! News noted, the numbers have trended closer to a majority following the Ukraine news. For example, the Monmouth poll saw a 9 percentage-point increase than when the question was asked in the same poll conducted in August, before news of the scandal.

Trump, meanwhile, has continued to deny he did anything wrong on his call with the Ukrainian president. As The Inquisitr reported earlier Tuesday, the president lashed out at Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff in a tweet that wondered why the California lawmaker hadn’t been charged with a crime. On Monday, Trump, also on Twitter, accused Schiff of treason.

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Trump has taken issue with a statement Schiff, who is the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, made last week before Congress, in which the congressman paraphrased the language the president used on his call with Zelensky. Trump claims Schiff’s comments, which the congressman admitted were an exaggerated parody rather than a verbatim retelling, did not accurately depict the nature of the conversation between the U.S. and Ukrainian leaders.

But, as The Inquisitr noted, while exaggerated, Schiff’s comments echoed many of the statements that the president made as seen in a summarized transcript of the call released by the White House last Wednesday. On that call, the U.S. president asked the Ukrainian president to investigate a corruption conspiracy linking the president’s potential 2020 rival, former Vice President Joe Biden, to the removal of a prosecutor in Ukraine. The theory has previously been debunked.

Trump has repeatedly said that the call, which a whistleblower filed a complaint in August about after hearing about it from several secondhand sources, was “perfect.” The president has also targeted the whistleblower in addition to congressional democrats on Twitter following news of the whistleblower report and the subsequent impeachment inquiry, announced by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday.