Meghan Markle Secretly Visits Memorial Of Murdered South African Teen

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles as she departs a Commonwealth Day Youth Event at Canada House with Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex on March 11, 2019 in London, England.
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Meghan Markle secretly paid a visit to a memorial for a murdered South African as a “personal gesture.” The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were reportedly so impacted by the story of the 19-year-old woman who was raped, tortured, and murdered in August, that Markle made a top-secret visit to the place where she was killed in order to leave a memorial ribbon.

According to The Sun, Markle visited the post office where Uyinene Mrwetyna was abducted and bludgeoned to death with a post office scale before her body was dumped in a nearby town. The violent murder sparked intense backlash and demonstrations decrying the violence against women in the country.

Markle tied a yellow ribbon around the railing at the Clareinch Post Office, where the University of Cape Town student was abducted, and left a note to show her solidarity with the people fighting against the violence. The Duchess also spoke with the victim’s mother, conveying her and Harry’s condolences.

Markle dressed down in jeans and a simple white shirt with her hair down and loose as she somberly left her message of condolences and solidarity. As she did, local people asked to take photos with the Duchess, but security turned them away.

The community responded to the visit with gratitude. Aaliyah Jacobs, a 17-year-old who attends Livingstone High School near the post office, said that Markle’s visit will help raise awareness for the issue.

“We love Meghan. It’s a good thing that she did this. She’s raising awareness and then everyone around the world will be aware of gender violence in South Africa and the terrible murder that happened here at the post office across the road from our school,” she said. “The tragic murder of Uyinene has had a huge impact on many lives such as myself and many young women, making them feel vulnerable. We are afraid to go out, some are afraid to go to school because of what happened to Uyinene.”

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“Simi kunye kulesisimo” – ‘We stand together in this moment’ The Duchess of Sussex has tied a ribbon at the site where 19-year-old Cape Town student Uyinene Mrwetyana was murdered last month, to pay her respects and to show solidarity with those who have taken a stand against gender based violence and femicide. Over the last month in Capetown, protests erupted through the streets in outrage over GBV in South Africa. The Duke and Duchess had been following what had happened from afar and were both eager to learn more when they arrived in South Africa. The Duchess spoke to the mother of Uyinene this week to relay their condolences. Visiting the site of this tragic death and being able to recognise Uyinene, and all women and girls effected by GBV (specifically in South Africa, but also throughout the world) was personally important to The Duchess. Uyinene’s death has mobilised people across South Africa in the fight against gender based violence, and is seen as a critical point in the future of women’s rights in South Africa. The Duchess has taken private visits and meetings over the last two days to deepen her understanding of the current situation and continue to advocate for the rights of women and girls. For more information on the recent events in South Africa, please see link in bio. #AmINext

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“It means a lot that she came to our community and paid tribute without showing off without any publicity. She was being genuine,” said another student.

As The Inquisitr previously reported, Prince Harry made his own homage during the same trip while visiting Angola. He walked through a field of potentially live landmines to detonate a mine in order to demonstrate how the anti-personal landmines were harming innocent people who worked in the area. His mother, Princess Diana, had made a similar display in 1997 to help bring attention to the destructive devices that wreak havoc on local communities.