Scooter Braun Blasts Taylor Swift Over Record Label Drama: ‘Hurt People Hurt People’

Braun implied Swift was unwilling to discuss her beef with him, which she made public when he bought her former record label in July.

Scooter Braun (L), Taylor Swift (R)
Bennett Raglin / Kevin Winter / Getty Images

Braun implied Swift was unwilling to discuss her beef with him, which she made public when he bought her former record label in July.

Music industry executive Scooter Braun is finally speaking out about the allegations that megastar Taylor Swift leveled against him. Over the summer, she claimed he was responsible for bullying her after he purchased Swift’s former record label Big Machine Records from Scott Borchetta earlier in this year. Braun, who represents artists like Ariana Grande, Justin Bieber, and Demi Lovato, became the owner of Swift’s first six albums following his purchase.

Braun made the claims against Swift in an interview on Wide Open, a podcast hosted by former football player Tony Gonzalez.

When Braun purchased Big Machine Records for a rumored $300 million in July, he purchased Swift’s entire catalog at the time, which included albums Taylor Swift, Fearless, Speak Now, Red, 1989, and Reputation. Swift’s seventh studio album, Lover, which was released in August, was released under Swift’s new label, Republic Records, which allows her to own her master recordings per the contract with the label.

Braun public praised Lover, however, following its August release, per a previous report from The Inquisitr.

Braun doesn’t seem to be taking much of the blame for the altercation, which fans were alerted to when Swift authored a lengthy letter to fans, posted to her Tumblr page in July. In her Tumblr post, Swift alleged she was repeatedly denied the opportunity to purchase her master recordings from Borchetta.

“It’s hard when you get attacked and it’s not based on any truth, but for that other person it may be based in truth but they don’t have all the information. And that’s why I am always open to communication and having a conversation with someone and saying, ‘Maybe this was a misunderstanding and I am happy to have the conversation with you.’ But not everybody is willing to do that,” Braun told Wide Open host Tony Gonzalez, implying that the “Lover” singer was not willing to talk to him.

“If I go through life with no malicious intent … hurt people hurt people,” Braun continued. “They’re going to project it onto you, they are going to say certain things.”

Swift has been open about past feuds, particularly her feud with rapper Kanye West and his wife, Kim Kardashian West. It began over a decade ago when the rapper stormed the stage as Swift was accepting an award at the MTV Video Music Awards. West infamously took the stage, grabbed the microphone, and said that he thought Beyoncé was snubbed for the award.

West and Swift then had an on-again, off-again friendship that seemed to finally end for good when Swift expressed outrage over the lyrics to West’s “Famous,” in which the rapper calls her a “b*tch” and says he still might have sex with her. West’s wife, reality star Kim Kardashian, would later post video clips to her Snapchat of a phone call that implied that Swift knew about the lyrics before the song was published. Swift denies she knew about all of the song’s lyrics.

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It’s blue, the feeling I got ????

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The feud and backlash Swift received as a result was the inspiration behind Reputation, her sixth full-length LP, which included fiery songs like”Look What You Made Me Do” and “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things.”

Swift has recently explained some of the details surrounding another notable public feuds with fellow pop star Katy Perry. The feud was even rumored to have spawned Swift’s 2015 hit single “Bad Blood.” While the two haven’t exactly said what caused the feud, there’s certainly no bad blood between the two anymore. Katy made an appearance in the music video for Taylor’s summer single “You Need To Calm Down,” which Swift explained was both an anthem for LGBTQ+ rights and meant to champion unity among women.