Prince Harry’s Dangerous Journey Across Landmine Field Honors Late Mother Princess Diana

Prince Harry in Africa walking with The Halo Trust in a landmine field. The Princess of Wales watches a Rugby match in Paris, France.
Dominic Lipinski/ Pascal Rondeau / Getty Images

Prince Harry took a dangerous journey across a landmine field in an effort to continue the brave work of his late mother, Princess Diana, to rid the world of these destructive, hidden devices, and to honor the global movement she started in 1997.

It was 22 years ago that the People’s Princess famously walked across a live landmine field to bring awareness to the issue of anti-personal landmines, and how they were maiming and killing innocent people who lived and worked in the areas they were placed. Princess Diana visited Angola clad in a face protector and chest protector and walked the area to show the danger the devices held.

Her son, Prince Harry, wearing an outfit similar to his late mother’s, visited a HALO Trust mine site outside Dirico in Angola. He remotely detonated a mine and met with members of the community to learn how the de-mining efforts are benefiting the local population, reported People Magazine.

The prince then spoke out, like his mother before him, about the importance of clearing landmines for humanitarian reasons, reported the news and entertainment outlet.

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“If an international ban on mines can be secured it means, looking far ahead, that the world may be a safer place for this generation's grandchildren.” – Princess Diana, 1997 Today in Angola The Duke of Sussex will retrace his mother’s steps to see the legacy of her work and how her connection with this community helped make the elimination of landmines a reality. In 1997 Diana Princess of Wales visited Huambo to bring global attention to the crisis of landmines and the people whose lives were being destroyed. Two decades later, the area has transformed from desolate and unhabitable to lively and vibrant, with colleges, schools and small businesses. The Duke is humbled to be visiting a place and a community that was so special to his mother, and to recognise her tireless mission as an advocate for all those she felt needed her voice the most, even if the issue was not universally popular. Princess Diana’s visit helped change the course of history, and directly led to the Convention against Anti-Personal Landmines, also known as the Ottawa Treaty. Today, with the support of @thehalotrust, Angola now has a stated aim under the Treaty to be clear of known mines by 2025. Despite great progress, 60 million people worldwide still live in fear of landmines every day. During his visit today, The Duke will walk along the street which was once the minefield where his mother was famously pictured. #RoyalTourAfrica #RoyalVisitAngola Photo©️PA

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“This historic commitment is a key step forward for the movement to rid the world of mines and lay the foundation for a safe and just future for the next generation,” he said, as reported by People Magazine. “Landmines are an unhealed scar of war. By clearing the landmines, we can help this community find peace, and with peace comes opportunity.”

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Following in the footsteps of his mother, Princess Diana, this morning The Duke of Sussex visited a de-mining site in Dirico, Angola, to raise awareness of the danger and prevalence of landmines that still exists today. The Duke joined @thehalotrust in their work to help clear the area to enable safe access for the local community. • “If an international ban on mines can be secured it means, looking far ahead, that the world may be a safer place for this generation's grandchildren.” – Princess Diana, 1997 Today in Angola The Duke of Sussex will retrace his mother’s steps to see the legacy of her work and how her connection with this community helped make the elimination of landmines a reality. In 1997 Diana Princess of Wales visited Huambo to bring global attention to the crisis of landmines and the people whose lives were being destroyed. Two decades later, the area has transformed from desolate and unhabitable to lively and vibrant, with colleges, schools and small businesses. The Duke is humbled to be visiting a place and a community that was so special to his mother, and to recognise her tireless mission as an advocate for all those she felt needed her voice the most, even if the issue was not universally popular. Princess Diana’s visit helped change the course of history, and directly led to the Convention against Anti-Personal Landmines, also known as the Ottawa Treaty. Today, with the support of @thehalotrust, Angola now has a stated aim under the Treaty to be clear of known mines by 2025. Despite great progress, 60 million people worldwide still live in fear of landmines every day. During his visit today, The Duke will walk along the street which was once the minefield where his mother was famously pictured. #RoyalVisitAfrica #RoyalVisitAngola Photo©️PA

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He then explained he would visit the exact site his mother walked, which is now a safe area.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle also honored the late princess’ work by posting a quote from her on their Instagram page alongside a photo of Princess Diana as she walked the minefield.

The late princess took on this humanitarian cause after her divorce from Prince Charles was finalized in 1997. She yearned to make a difference in the world by focusing on issues that she would have never been allowed to pursue as a working member of the royal family. One was the issue of live minefields in areas where people lived and worked. The other was AIDS research and destigmatizing the disease at a time when people were still unsure of how it was contracted.

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The Inquisitr previously reported that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle journeyed to Africa in their first royal tour as a family, bringing along son Archie and introducing him to Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

Africa holds a dear spot in Prince Harry’s heart.

“I came here in 1997, 1998 straight after my mom [Princess Diana] died, so it was a nice place to get away from it all. But now I feel deeply connected to Africa,” he said, reported People Magazine.

It was in Botswana that he and Meghan spent their first time together alone as a couple, camping out under the stars for several days. Meghan’s engagement ring also has a diamond sourced from Botswana.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will end their royal tour of Africa within one week.