Journalist Cokie Roberts Dead At 75

Journalist Cokie Roberts appears at the National Press Foundation's 26th annual awards dinner
Brendan Hoffman / Getty Images

Legendary journalist Cokie Roberts has died at the age of 75. The family has confirmed the death of the Emmy Award winner and bestselling author who is known for being a pioneer in paving the way for women in journalism.

NPR confirms Roberts’ death, noting that a family statement detailed that Cokie died on Tuesday as a result of breast cancer complications.

Roberts joined NPR in its early days, beginning with the outlet in 1978. She joined ABC News in 1988 and remained with NPR in a part-time role until her passing this week.

Cokie reported on politics extensively over the years, and she grew up immersed in politics herself. She is the daughter of former representatives and personally knew the ins-and-outs of Washington, D.C.

Roberts never ran for a political position herself, seemingly being the only one in her family who avoided that route. However, she considered her role as a political journalist to be essential as well.

As ABC News notes, Roberts won three Emmy Awards over the years. The Library of Congress deemed her a “Living Legend” more than a decade ago, and she is a member of the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame. In addition, the organization American Women in Radio and Television considered her one of the top 50 women in broadcasting history.

The iconic journalist was born with the name Mary Martha Corinne Morrison Claiborne Boggs. It seems that her older brother had trouble pronouncing the name Corinne, and that’s where she got the nickname of Cokie. It stuck with her for the rest of her life.

Loading...

Roberts attended Wellesley College, graduating with a political science degree in 1964. After graduating, she was a foreign correspondent via radio for CBS, and she co-anchored This Week from 1996 to 2002 alongside Sam Donaldson.

In addition to her decades of broadcast journalism, Roberts wrote eight books. A number of those became New York Times bestsellers, and Cokie typically wrote about women who made an impact throughout American history.

The journalist was first diagnosed in 2002 with breast cancer, but her initial treatments were successful. This past summer, she noted she had been dealing with some health issues, but she insisted that she was fine.

Cokie leaves behind her husband Steven Roberts, who is also a journalist, along with two children and six grandchildren. As The Inquisitr previously reported, Cokie’s mother Lindy Boggs passed away in 2013 at the age of 97. The journalist’s father, Thomas Hale Boggs, died in 1972.