Liz Cheney Says Donald Trump Makes World ‘Safer’ Than Barack Obama, Defends Firing Of John Bolton

The Wyoming Republican defended the president's decision to fire his national security advisor on an appearance on 'Meet The Press.'

House Republican Conference Chair Liz Cheney (R-WY) and fellow GOP House leaders hold a news conference following their weekly Republican Conference at the U.S. Capitol June 11, 2019 in Washington, DC.
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The Wyoming Republican defended the president's decision to fire his national security advisor on an appearance on 'Meet The Press.'

The daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, Rep. Liz Cheney, defended President Donald Trump’s decision last week to fire John Bolton as his national security advisor and claimed that the United States was safer under the Trump administration than under that of former President Barack Obama, according to an account of the exchange published by The Hill.

The Wyoming Republican made the comments to NBC’s Chuck Todd on an appearance on the network’s Sunday show, Meet The Press. Cheney claimed that the nation was safer under President Trump’s foreign policy decisions than the country was under Obama’s administration. Specifically, the daughter of the former vice president said that the country was safer because of the president’s decision to end a nuclear deal with Iran that was negotiated by the previous president.

Cheney also claimed that the military did not get necessary resources under the former president’s administration.

According to the report from The Hill, Cheney also used her television opportunity to double down on disagreements with her fellow Republican lawmaker, Texas Sen. Rand Paul. The two had quarreled last week on social media.

“I think if you look back at what Sen. Paul has said over many, many years he’s very different from where President Trump is on these issues,” Cheney said, per The Hill. “President Trump puts America first, Sen. Paul — whenever given the opportunity — blames America first,” she said.

Despite Cheney’s praise, the past few weeks have sparked controversy for the president on the national security front. In a tweet last week, the president announced he had canceled a meeting with Taliban officials that was secretly scheduled to take place at Camp David, just days before the 18th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

The president also announced Bolton’s firing in a tweet this week, which led Bolton to take to his own Twitter account to dispute the president’s account of his firing. According to Bolton’s tweet, Bolton told the president he planned to resign from his White House position, but the president told him they should talk about it the following morning, Bolton claimed. The president, instead, tweeted that next morning that he had asked Bolton for his resignation.

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In subsequent tweets, the president would claim that Bolton disagreed with Trump and several other people in the administration on issues pertaining to policies in Venezuela and Cuba.

The president also has faced criticism following a decision to divert funding for military construction projects in order to build his long-promised wall on the border between the United States and Mexico, which has left some Democrats furious, according to a previous report from The Inquisitr.