Michael Jackson’s Accusers, Wade Robson And James Safechuck, Address Dave Chappelle’s Comments

Michael Jackson announces plans for Summer residency at the O2 Arena at a press conference held at the O2 Arena on March 5, 2009 in London, England.
Tim Whitby / Getty Images

As The Inquisitr previously reported, Dave Chappelle recently said in his new Netflix special, Sticks & Stones, that he doesn’t believe Michael Jackson’s accusers, Wade Robson and James Safechuck. The pair made the accusations in the controversial HBO documentary, Leaving Neverland, in which they claim the King of Pop molested them as children.

TMZ reports that both Robson and Safechuck have responded to Chappelle’s comments.

“He can say whatever he wants,” Robson said. “It reveals him, not us.”

Robson’s lawyer, Vince Finaldi, also threw in his two cents.

“Although Mr. Chappelle is entitled to his opinions, however misinformed they may be, it’s unfortunate that he has chosen to use his platform to shame sexual abuse victims, and spread his ignorance of sexual abuse and the way it is perpetrated upon children, in an attempt to resurrect his career,” he said.

Finaldi suggests that Chappelle look to the career of fellow comedian Hannibal Buress, who drew attention to Bill Cosby’s alleged sexual abuse and used his platform to enact positive social change.

As for Safechuck, he claims to feel for the other children who are suffering from sexual abuse.

“I’m heartbroken for all those children who look to see how they will be received when they finally find the courage to speak out about their sexual abuse.”

Safechuck reached out to other survivors and said they shouldn’t let the behavior of Chappelle or anyone else prevent them from coming forward.

“Together we are strong,” he said.

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Per The Inquisitr, the documentary Michael Jackson: Chase the Truth was recently released to streaming services and acts to counter Leaving Neverland and attack its credibility. The film highlights that Robson and Safechuck filed an unsuccessful civil action against the Jackson estate, suggesting that this failure is what pushed them to create Leaving Neverland with director Dan Reed.

In addition, writer Mike Smallcombe notes that the pair have both defended Jackson under oath on multiple occasions, which makes them perjurers.

“When money is involved you need to be wary,” he said.

Others, such as filmmaker Louis Theroux, believe that Jackson supporters are being ignorant and are suffering from self-grooming. He claims that these defenders are unable to realize that people who have suffered from sexual abuse may take years to process that they were victims.

Theroux claims that sexual abuse throws off the circuits of the brain in ways that most people can’t understand. He suggests that this lack of understanding is why so many of Jackson’s defenders cannot see things from the victims’ perspectives.