Michael Jackson’s Unique Fruitarian Diet Inspired Couple That Wanted His ‘Radiant Glow’

Michael Jackson announces plans for Summer residency at the O2 Arena at a press conference held at the O2 Arena on March 5, 2009 in London, England.
Tim Whitby / Getty Images

Daily Mirror reports that Michael Jackson’s diet inspired couple Ali Reza Khorasany and Daniella Siira to adopt a diet that consists of 98 percent fruit. The remainder of the diet is green juices, nuts, and salads.

According to Khorasany, he found inspiration in Jackson’s fruitarian diet following a visit to the doctor in 2014, in which he complained of excess wind, bloating, constipation, acne, fatigue, dark circles, and dehydration.

“The real nugget in the whole story was my long-time fanaticism over Michael Jackson who maintained a lean body, radiant glow, endless energy and clarity of mind consistently for his whole career,” he said.

“I started with the statement ‘something is wrong’. I dug out as much research as I could as to what was MJ doing that we are not, and just as important, what he was…not doing.”

Khorasany said Jackson didn’t eat any animal products and adhered to a vegetarian diet, which was a term used in the ’80s to describe an essentially vegan diet. Most importantly, Jackson mostly drank raw, fresh orange juice.

The raw vegan fruit-based diet has been adopted by many in recent years and is often high in carbs from fresh whole fruit.

As for Siira, she struggled with anorexia, digestive issues, over-exercising, binge eating, and anxiety, and the switch to Jackson’s diet helped.

“It is a very unique way of eating and being, so it takes practice to be able to eat this way in today’s world,” she said.

Loading...

Siira claims that she noticed immediate effects after switching to the fruit-based diet. She says her bloating decreased, and her gas and digestive issues subsided.

“I feel clearer minded, positive, loving and social,” she said, adding that she never has to worry about what to eat on the go.

But a 10 Daily report suggests that the fruitarian diet isn’t for everyone. Writer Kathy Parker suggested that the diet fueled her eating disorder as she became too anxious over meeting the standards of the diet. Parker claims that this threw her into a cycle of guilt, obsession, control, punishment, and reward.

The Sun reports that others have had curious degrees of success with the fruitarian diet. Mother Anne Osborne claims that she has only eaten fruit for the past 27 years and says she never gets hungry. She also claims to have raised her children on the same raw diet. When Osborne goes out with friends, she eats melon for the starter, main, and dessert.