‘Heavy Metal’ Nintendo 64 Boasts Built-In Flamethrowers

Boxes of the Nintendo 64 video game system sit on the shelves October 26, 2000 at a Toys R Us store in El Paso, Texas. The Nintendo and Sega Dreamcast platforms are the main competition for the new Sony PlayStation 2 which went on sale October 26, 2000 across the United States.
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A new modded Nintendo 64 created by retro gaming YouTuber BitHead1000 has a heavy metal shell attached to dual gas valves and small plastic tubes that spray lighter fluid to create built-in flamethrowers.

Kotaku reports the device also has a couple of other new additions: a red button below the system’s center control stick to trigger the flamethrower and a spinning 3D metal N64 logo on the front of the system that’s backlit by a red light for a cool effect.

N64 mods aren’t uncommon. Trusted Reviews outlined a handheld version of the system that’s made from a 7-inch LCD, two lithium-polymer batteries, some old iPod speakers, and the original input controllers. Another is the Tron mod from Zoki64, which was created using glow-in-the-dark paint that charges via sunlight or UV light.

There are also more practical mods focused on adapting the system to modern hardware. The Verge reports that a new third-party adapter called the Eon Super 64 is designed to make the retro system look good on modern TVs. The device connects to the N64’s video-out port and is connected to an HDMI, which is then attached into the HDMI port on a modern TV. The only downside — according to The Verge — is that it doesn’t work with PAL consoles from Europe, Australia, and other regions.

Unlike the NES and Super Nintendo, the N64 hasn’t received a Classic edition yet, and it doesn’t appear likely to happen.

“We were clear when we did the first two Classic series that, for us, these were limited time opportunities that were a way for us as a business to bridge from the conclusion of Wii U as a hardware system to the launch of Nintendo Switch,” said former president of Nintendo of America, Reggie Fils-Aime.

“That was the very strategic reason we launched the NES Classic system,” he said.

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Fils-Aime said that — despite consumer anticipation — Nintendo views Classic systems as “limited time opportunities.”

“We’ve also now been very clear that as the consumer looks forward to engaging with our classic content that is going to happen more and more with the subscription service.”

Although Fils-Aime didn’t rule out an N64 classic, he confirmed it’s “not in our planning horizon.”

Regardless, BGR reports that Hyperkin project manager Andrew Steel revealed that the company is going to release the Retron Ult Premium Retro Gaming Console for N64. Although no details are released as of yet, it will reportedly play original N64 cartridges at 720p.