Official TSA Liquid Rules Before Your Vacation To Save Your Coveted Toiletries

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There is nothing worse when traveling than getting your toiletries, medication, or cosmetics pitched out because they don’t follow the current guidelines. Airports in different countries will hold you to various standards of the rules, but it’s still important to know the basics for your carry-on bag.

Town & Country shared some of the TSA liquid rules you should know to avoid mistakes while traveling. The TSA liquid rules also pertain to aerosols, gels, butter, creams, and pastes. All liquids must be in a 3.4-oz or smaller container, so check their sizes, and if they’re too big, leave them at home or transfer them to a smaller container. It doesn’t matter how much liquid is in the container, as the bottle or jar must hold 3.4 oz or smaller.

You also need to make sure that all of your liquid containers can fit in a quart-size bag. Bring items with you that you can’t buy at your destination or that you might need on the plane.

But the rules aren’t just for liquids, as the TSA now also has requirements for powders, which include makeup, baby powder, protein powder and powdered drink mixes. All of these must be in containers size 12 oz or smaller, or they must be put in a checked bag.

Only empty water bottles can be taken through a TSA checkpoint, so if you have a refillable water bottle, make sure it’s empty before you get in line. Bottles can be refilled in the terminal before you board the plane.

On the TSA Twitter page, new rules are in place in reference to medication.

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“Liquid medication, such as nasal spray, is allowed in your carry-on bag and can be more than 3.4 ounces. However, please let our officers know you have this item and place it in a separate bin for X-ray screening.”

The TSA also put together a YouTube video called “TSA Cares” to tell travelers what to expect on their next trip to the airport.

The Travel shared that even if you check your bags, it’s always best to keep any medication in your carry-on bag. It’s best to keep all of your medicines together so if they need to be checked, a TSA agent can take the medications bag out and put it back into your luggage. Make sure that prescription medication is clearly labeled, and let an agent know if you are transporting any diabetic supplies, especially syringes.