New Loch Ness Monster Sighting: Not One But Two 20-Foot Creatures Caught On Webcam Video, Nessie Hunter Claims

A veteran 'Nessie' hunter claims that he spotted two separate monsters swimming side-by-side while viewing a live stream from Loch Ness.

The Loch Ness Monster swims.
Keystone / Getty Images

A veteran 'Nessie' hunter claims that he spotted two separate monsters swimming side-by-side while viewing a live stream from Loch Ness.

The history of Loch Ness Monster sightings is a long one. The legend of “Nessie,” a huge but mysterious sea creature that supposedly lives in the murky waters of Loch Ness, a 26-mile-long lake near Inverness, Scotland, is said to extend back 2,000 years. Soldiers of the Roman Empire arriving in Scotland noted drawings of the creature by indigenous Pictish tribes, according to a historical account by Time.com. The Romans described the “monster” as “a strange beast with an elongated beak or muzzle, a head locket or spout, and flippers instead of feet.”

That same, basic description of the Loch Ness Monster has endured for two millennia — and was the basis for the most famous photograph of Nessie, seen above on this page, taken by an anonymous photographer in 1934. The photo became so iconic that it was included in the Time 100 Photos collection of the 20th century’s most important photographs. Sadly, however, as Time reported, the photo was later revealed as a hoax perpetrated by big-game hunter Marmaduke Wetherell and British medical doctor, Robert Wilson.

But on July 10, a longtime Loch Ness Monster researcher says that he witnessed not one but two sea creatures swimming side-by-side near Urquhart Bay on the north shore of Loch Ness. But the sighting by 54-year-old Eoin O’Faodhagain came by the most 21st century method possible — on a webcam live stream, according to Britain’s Daily Mail newspaper.

Watch that very same live stream, operated by Mikko Takala — described on his YouTube channel as “probably the world’s leading Loch Ness Monster expert,” in the video below.

O’Faodhagain, of County Donegal, Ireland, made his own recording of the live stream, in order to rewatch the video and verify that the objects he saw were genuine Nessies.

“When I noticed the two strange shapes first they were either side of each other and not behind each other, going in the same general direction,” the monster hunter said, as quoted by The Mirror newspaper.

“Never did I think it was two humps from the one animal, the sighting did not give me that impression,” he said, adding that his observations allowed him to estimate the length of the two supposed creatures at 20 feet long each, with their “humps” extending about five feet above the water’s surface, according to the Mirror account.

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The Inverness area is now preparing for a possible September 21 invasion of the area by Nessie enthusiasts mobilized by a Facebook group, which encourages monster hunters to descend en masse on the legendary lake, because “Nessie can’t hide from us all.”

But the Loch Ness branch of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, which is responsible for rescuing boaters and others who get into life-threatening situations on the lake, warned this week that Loch Ness — monster or no monster — is not a welcoming place, with waves that can rise up to 16 feet high, and weather conditions that “deteriorate rapidly, going from flat calm to a large swell in minutes,” as quoted by Xinhua News Agency. The rescuers say that if thousands of Nessie hunters “storm” the lake at once, their lifesaving capabilities will be stretched thin, and the situation will become extremely hazardous.