QAnon, Support For Donald Trump Motivated Accused Murderer Of Mob Boss, Lawyer Claims

Qanon fans at a Trump rally
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The man accused of carrying out the first murder of a New York City mob boss in decades was motivated by a desire to help President Donald Trump, as well as belief in the QAnon conspiracy theory, the man’s lawyer said in a legal filing this week.

Per The New York Times, which cited court documents filed by counsel, Anthony Comello “only wanted to arrest” Francesco (Franky Boy) Cali, the reputed head of the Gambino crime family. But instead, after Cali refused to comply with the citizen’s arrest, he shot the mob associate 10 times. Cali was arrested three days later.

Comello’s lawyer Robert C. Gottlieb said in official documents, “ardently believed that Francesco Cali, a boss in the Gambino crime family, was a prominent member of the deep state, and, accordingly, an appropriate target for a citizen’s arrest.” Gottlieb is not denying that Comello is not the shooter, but rather is arguing that his client should be found not guilty by reason of mental defect.

The attorney also wrote that the accused shooter “became certain that he was enjoying the protection of President Trump himself, and that he had the president’s full support.”

The accused murderer is reportedly an adherent of the “QAnon” conspiracy theory, which alleges that a cabal of “deep state” operatives are both active pedophiles and are working to undermine President Trump. Those who believe in the theory allege that an anonymous message board poster known as “Q” is constantly feeding them clues about the mass arrests that are coming of the president’s opponents.

When Comello made his first court appearance in March following his arrest, he used to be associated with the conspiracy theory, per The Inquisitr. and even wrote the letter “Q” on his hands. The accused shooter also wrote “MAGA forever” on his hand, indicating allegiance to President Trump.

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Another branch of the theory continues that John F. Kennedy, Jr. is still alive and will reveal himself as Q, or someone else supportive of the conspiracy theory. People wearing “Q” clothes and carrying signs are often present at President Trump’s campaign rallies.

When Cali was first shot, speculation centered on the possibility that an organized crime rival had bumped him off, as was the case when Paul Castellano, also a past Gambino family boss, was gunned down in 1985.

“Mr. Comello’s support for ‘QAnon’ went beyond mere participation in a radical political organization,” the lawyer also wrote. “It evolved into a delusional obsession.”