Alex Acosta Could Land ‘With A Parachute’ After Jeffrey Epstein Scandal

U.S. Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta speaks during a press conference July 10, 2019 at the Labor Department.
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Per The Inquisitr, Alexander Acosta, who gave convicted sex offender and accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein his cushy non-prosecution agreement over a decade ago, resigned as secretary of Labor for President Donald Trump’s White House on Friday.

But while this move might seem like a big dent in Acosta’s finances and career, Vice reports that Acosta will likely do just fine and may even be able to earn a healthy profit from the Epstein scandal.

“Every place Acosta has landed, he has landed with a parachute,” said Raul Martinez, a former mayor for the city of Hialeah in Miami-Dade, pointing to Acosta’s high-profile gigs that he landed based on connections, including the dean of Florida International University — despite not having a background in education.

Bill Schaefer, an Orlando-based litigator and former prosecutor, believes that Acosta will have no trouble moving back to private life and moving forward from the scandal.

“I don’t see a criminal prosecution against Acosta unless more can be shown that there was a quid pro quo for Epstein’s plea agreement,” he said.

“As we’ve often seen, fallen public officials have avenues in the private sector for them to pursue. Acosta would be a valuable asset to some law firms or corporations on labor issues.”

Retired Miami-Dade County Court Judge Jeffrey Swartz believes that Acosta will likely have many valuable Republican relationships from his time as secretary of Labor and won’t have a problem finding work — whether that’s as a consultant, lobbyist, or something else.

“I don’t see him being left without the ability to make a living,” Swartz said.

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Before Acosta’s resignation as secretary of labor, Trump was worried that the media attention on Acosta’s role in the Epstein scandal would hurt the White House, per The Inquisitr. Even before he stepped down, Acosta made it clear in a news conference that if Trump asked him to step down, he would.

“If at some point the President decides that I am not the best person to do this job, I respect that,” he said.

CNN reports that, over a decade ago, Acosta sentenced Epstein to just 13 months and allowed him to work from his office for long periods of time. Epstein was also able to dodge a federal trial, although he had to register as a sex offender.

One White House official even claims that some in the West Wing are beginning to scrutinize Acosta’s past legal actions to see if anything else curious is discovered.