Michael Jackson’s Doctor Conrad Murray Wishes He Had Never Met The Pop Star

Singer Michael Jackson departs early from the Santa Barbara County courthouse at the end of the sixth week of his trial April 8, 2005 in Santa Maria, California.
Carlo Allegri / Getty Images

As The Inquisitr previously reported, Michael Jackson’s doctor, Conrad Murray — who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in 2011 for his role in Jackson’s death — revealed that the pop star’s last confession may have been given to Murray through Jackson’s daughter, Paris.

But the same report in The Sun that made the shocking revelation contains many other interesting pieces of information, including Murray’s feelings about his relationship with Jackson. Murray claims that his closeness with Jackson made the 10 years that have passed since his death fly by, and added that he still remembers the positivity of their friendship, despite what happened since his death.

“However I also wish I had never met Michael Jackson for what has happened to me,” he added.

“I wish that night, that ungodly hour I when I was called after midnight, sleeping in the bed next to my partner Nicole and my three-month-old son, when they made this request for me to come to the home and to take care of Michael I should have flatly said, ‘No’.”

Murray’s wish is understandable. In Killing Michael Jackson, the hour-long documentary that explores Jackson’s death, detectives Orlando Martinez, Dan Myers, and Scott Smith reveal that they believe Murray should be found guilty for second-degree murder – not manslaughter. Martinez claims that one of the reasons for this is because Murray cleaned up after he discovered Jackson’s body, per Metro.

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“Mr Murray started cleaning up the mess that he had left, covering up the medical treatment that he was giving. He put that away, called for help from security, and directed them to call 911,” Martinez said, adding that afterward, Murray began giving Jackson one-handed CPR, which was ineffective.

In addition to criticisms from detectives Martinez, Myers, and Smith, Steve Shafer, professor of anesthesiology at Stanford University, believes that Murray was aware of the dangers of his actions. He claims that nobody who received proper training in propofol administration would allow an uncontrolled infusion rate.

The Sun reveals that Jackson reportedly hid the extent of his drug dependence from Murray. Jackson was also reportedly injected with the synthetic opioid Demerol 51 times over the last 60 days of his life. Murray believes that this substance is what led to Jackson’s death, and says that Jackson was not open with him about his drug use. Murray also claims that he is thorough when it comes to obtaining patient information, and said that his opposition to drug abuse is likely why Jackson hid his struggle from him.